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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 738 738 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 8 8 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 4 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for June, 1865 AD or search for June, 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
ounded at Bristoe Station, October 14, 1863; James B. Culton, wounded at Bristoe Station, October 14, 1865; A. J. Griffin, wounded at Alleghany Mountain, December 12, 1861; ——Gaylor, Cross Keys, June 8. 1862. Died from Sickness—William Allen, Joseph Cash, John Cash, William Cash, and Marvel Coffey, at Staunton in 1861; Eugene Durham, 1864; James Goolsby, 1861; Thomas Gordon, 1861; W. L. Hamilton, Petersburg, in 1865; John F. Hamilton, in prison, 1864; Ed. N. Heizer, at Charlottesville, June 1865; Samuel Hite and W. N. Hite, at Staunton, 1861; William Lawhorn, at Staunton, 1862; S. S. Miller and Thomas P. McDowell, at Gordonsville, 1862; William Orenbaun, 1861; James P. Paxton, in prison, 1863; John Paxton, at Richmond, 1862; Cooke Sloan, at Staunton, 1861; James Steele, at Point Lookout, April, 1865; Benjamin Templeton, at Staunton, 1861; John White and Cyrus Withers, at Richmond, 1862; J. Womeldorf, 1861. Wounded and Recovered—Hugh S. Beard, Charlottesville, May 3, 1862; Jame
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
, where we landed on the 12th, next day. Of the 600 whose names were called at Johnson's Island on the 9th of February, 1864, only 293 of the number answered the call at Fort Delaware on their return after months of perils, trials, sufferings and tribulations. Fort Delaware, taken altogether, was the dirtiest, filthiest and most unhealthy prison I ever saw, and I was there three times during my captivity. The remnant of the 600 remained at Fort Delaware until the general exchange in June, 1865. F. C. Barnes. Captain R. E. Frayser's experience. Captain Frayser was very reluctant in agreeing to write out some of his reminiscences of the imprisonment of the 600 at Morris Island. While a great portion of his time has been devoted to journalism since the war, he has written very little about the conflict between the States, nor does he talk much about it. The whole of his time is now given to the practice of law, and he is doing well in this profession. The narrative writte