Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for December 9th, 1865 AD or search for December 9th, 1865 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
ssion for a suffering woman, who had once been his friend, and to whom he admiited an obligation for former kindness, had lose its heartbeat. (121 War of the Rebellion, 683.) On the 28th of November the Rev. Charles Minnigerode asked permission to see Mr. Davis as his spiritual adviser, which request, after being pondered by the Secretary of War, the Attorney-General, and the Adjutant-General, was granted, and an order to that effect was sent to the reverend gentleman, who, on the 9th of December, 1865, presented the same to General Miles, who, fearing some deadly plot, wired the Adjutant-General to know if the order was genuine and whether the old doctor should be admitted. On the 10th his fears were put to rest and the order was verified. (121 War of the Rebellion, 818, 834.) Dr. Minnigerode, however, had to give a species of ecclesiastical parole, confining his conversation strictly to ghostly topics. (Id., 874.) On the 2d of October, 1865, because of the representation of th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
ssion for a suffering woman, who had once been his friend, and to whom he admiited an obligation for former kindness, had lose its heartbeat. (121 War of the Rebellion, 683.) On the 28th of November the Rev. Charles Minnigerode asked permission to see Mr. Davis as his spiritual adviser, which request, after being pondered by the Secretary of War, the Attorney-General, and the Adjutant-General, was granted, and an order to that effect was sent to the reverend gentleman, who, on the 9th of December, 1865, presented the same to General Miles, who, fearing some deadly plot, wired the Adjutant-General to know if the order was genuine and whether the old doctor should be admitted. On the 10th his fears were put to rest and the order was verified. (121 War of the Rebellion, 818, 834.) Dr. Minnigerode, however, had to give a species of ecclesiastical parole, confining his conversation strictly to ghostly topics. (Id., 874.) On the 2d of October, 1865, because of the representation of th