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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 780 780 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 302 302 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 91 91 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 88 88 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 58 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 44 44 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 44 44 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 37 37 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 25 25 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 23 23 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. You can also browse the collection for 1866 AD or search for 1866 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 6 document sections:

they receive official information to that effect. The official channels, through which such information must come, are the original records of the muster-out rolls; the final statements, as they are technically termed; and the affidavits which may accompany a pension claim. Now, the State of New Hampshire, and other States as well, have ascertained definitely that many of their missing men werekilled, and have revised their records accordingly; New Hampshire: Adjutant-General's Report, 1866: Vol. I. but, if these missing men have no heirs to prosecute their claims at the Pension Office, the records at Washington will remain unchanged and the men will still be recorded there, not among the killed, but as missing. The mortuary statistics in these pages are compiled largely from State records; hence, the figures in many cases will exceed those of the War Office. The variation, however, is not important enough to warrant this digression were it not for the honest endeavor to arri
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 5: casualties compared with those of European wars — loss in each arm of the service — deaths from disease — classification of deaths by causes. (search)
ea will also be obtained of the great struggle which occurred within our own borders, and with it will come a fuller recognition of American manhood. The Franco-Prussian war of 1870-71 was one of the greatest of European wars. Larger armies were never assembled. The Germans took 797, 950 men into France. Of this number, 28,277 were killed, or died of wounds — a loss of 3.1 per cent. In the Crimean war, the allied armies lost 3.2 per cent. in killed, or deaths from wounds. In the war of 1866, the Austrian army lost 2.6 per cent. from the same cause. But, in the American Civil War the Union Armies lost 4.7 per cent., and the Confederates over 9 per cent.; and this despite the greater area of country, which required a large share of the troops to protect the lines of communication. There are no figures on record to show that, even in the Napoleonic wars, there was ever a greater percentage of loss in killed. In fact, all the statistics pertaining to the earlier wars of the centur
, and General H. W. Birge to the command of the division. In March, 1865, Birge's Division, containing three brigades, eighteen regiments, was ordered to North Carolina, where it was attached temporarily to the Tenth Corps and was designated as the First Division of that corps. The Fourth Brigade of Birge's Division was left at Savannah, the whole division returning there in May. The Nineteenth corps remained at Savannah and vicinity until August, 1865; some of the regiments remained until 1866. The corps organization, however, was officially discontinued March 26, 1865. The portion of the corps left behind at New Orleans remained in the Department of the Gulf, and, in the spring of 1865, participated with the Thirteenth and Sixteenth corps in General Canby's operations against Fort Blakely, Spanish Fort, and Mobile. Twentieth Corps. (McCook's.) Stone's River Liberty Gap Chickamauga. This corps was identical with that part of the Army of the Cumberland, or Fourteent
ans, proceeding thence, in March, to Mobile, where it was prominently engaged in the siege of that place. In the successful assault on Fort Blakely, April 9, 1865, it lost 10 killed and 54 wounded; its colors were the first on the enemy's works, the color-sergeant falling dead in the charge. In June, 1864, the recruits left in the field by the Seventeenth Illinois, upon its return home, were transferred to the Eighth. The regiment remained on duty in Louisiana and Texas until the spring of 1866, and was finally mustered out at Baton Rouge, May 4, 1866. Ninth Illinois Infantry. Mersy's Brigade — Dodge's Division--Sixteenth Corps. (1) Col. Eleazer A. Paine, W. P.; Brig.-Gen. (2) Col. August Mersy; Bvt.Brig.-Gen. (3) Col. Samuel T. Hughes. companies. killed and died of wounds. died of disease, accidents, in Prison, &c. Total Enrollment. Officers. Men. Total. Officers. Men. Total. Field and Staff   1 1 1 1 2 16 Company A   13 13   17 17 129   B 2 3
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 13: aggregate of deaths in the Union Armies by States--total enlistment by States--percentages of military population furnished, and percentages of loss — strength of the Army at various dates casualties in the Navy. (search)
year. Assuming the average strength of the army to have been 1,000,000 men for four The period during which the loss from disease occurred was much longer than the period of the fighting. Many of the volunteer regiments were in service until 1866. years, and the average age to have been twenty-three, it appears that 32,000 of these deaths would have occurred in time of peace, and that the excess was due solely to the fatal vicissitudes of a soldier's life. In Table C, a subdivision is m. The Provost-Marshal-General estimated that 25 per cent. of these were wrongly reported; that these men were absent unintentionally or unavoidably.--and placed the number of actual desertions at 201, 397. Message and Documents, War Dept.; 1805-66. Part 3, p. 89 Of this The desertions were most frequent in the Regular Army, 16,365 men having deserted from that arm of the service during the war, a loss of over 24 per cent., while in the volunteer service the average rate was 6 per cent.
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
assigned to the old regiments to keep them up to an effective strength. The total loss of the Confederate Armies in killed and mortally wounded will never be definitely known, and can be stated only in round numbers. A summing up of the casualties at each battle and minor engagement — using official reports only, and in their absence accepting Confederate estimates — indicates that 94,000 men were killed or mortally wounded on the Confederate side during the war. In the report for 1865-6, made by General James B. Fry, United States Provost Marshal-General, there is a tabulation of Confederate losses as compiled from the muster-rolls on file in the Bureau of Confederate Archives. The returns are incomplete, and nearly all the Alabama rolls are missing. Still the figures are worth noting, as they show that at least 74,524 were killed or died of wounds; and, that 59,297 died of disease. From Gen. Fry's tabulation the following abstract is made: deaths in Confederate Armies