hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 780 780 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 302 302 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 91 91 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 88 88 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 58 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 44 44 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 44 44 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 37 37 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 25 25 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 23 23 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for 1866 AD or search for 1866 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Federal Navy (search)
rved thirteen years, they received an increase of two hundred U. S. Naval Academy. The faces of the graduates of 1866, and the view below of part of the Naval Academy grounds at Annapolis, taken in 1866, are the evidence of the peace-footin1866, are the evidence of the peace-footing to which the institution has been restored within a year. The cadets and instructors have returned from Newport in 1865 and resumed their old quarters, from which they had been precipitately driven by the first Confederate move on Washington. The of Civil War. Learning new lessons — the naval academy class of 1866 Naval Academy grounds in Annapolis, Maryland, 1866. dollars each two years, or $2250 a year at the expiration of thirteen years. On leave or waiting orders the lieutenant'srs. For deeds of prowess and valor they had been advanced many numbers in the line of promotion. The classes of 1865 and 1866 were very large, and for a long time after the reduction of the naval establishment, promotion in the service became excee
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The birth of the ironclads (search)
e-turreted monitors the Monadnock and the Miantonomoh startled the world after the war was over. Foreign and domestic skeptics maintained that Gustavus Vasa Fox, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, who had earnestly advocated the construction of monitors while the type was still an experiment, had merely succeeded in adding so many iron coffins to the navy. It was asserted that no monitor would prove seaworthy in heavy weather, to say nothing of being able to cross the ocean. In the spring of 1866, therefore, the Navy Department determined to despatch the Miantonomoh across the Atlantic; and, to show his faith in the iron coffins he had advocated, Assistant Secretary Fox embarked on her at St. John, N. B., on June 5th. Meanwhile the Monadnock had been despatched around the Horn to San Francisco; her progress was watched with far greater enthusiasm than that of the Oregon during the Spanish War. The Miantonomoh reached Queenstown in safety, after a passage of ten days and eighteen hour
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most famous naval action of the Civil war (search)
rt was driven off, and the Merrimac again opened on the Congress, although a white flag had been hoisted to show that she was out of action. Many of the Federal wounded were hit a second time; some were killed; the casualties among the Confederate gunboats, and even on the Merrimac, were considerably increased. Lieutenant Pendergrast and Commander The lesson of the ironclad — some of the first tests at the navy-yard Here in the Washington Navy-yard, as it appeared on Independence Day, 1866, are the evidences of what the American Civil War had taught not only the United States navy but the world's designers of warships. In four short years of experimentation in the throes of an internecine struggle, the Navy Department had not only evolved the most powerful fighting fleet on the seas of the world, but had stamped it with distinctively American ideas. In the picture, a year after the war, can be seen how the navy had begun to improve the experience it had gained. Already the t
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
dence. Yet with such a lineage of the free and open sea, Porter, like Farragut, proved that he could adapt himself to the cramped arenas of bay and river. It was for his part in the fall of Vicksburg that he was made rear-admiral in 1863. It was he, too, that was chosen to command the North Atlantic squadron in 1864, when a courageous and steady hand was needed to guide the most important naval operations to a successful outcome. For his services at Fort Fisher he was made vice-admiral in 1866 and was retired with the rank of admiral in 1870. unarmored prows. These rams are formidable things, he wrote reassuringly, but when there is room to maneuver, the heavy ships will run over them. On the night of April 20th, Captain Bell, on board the gunboat Pinola, with the Itasca, steamed up the river on the daring duty of cutting the chains and making a passageway for the waiting fleet. After adventures and misadventures that included the grounding of the Itasca, the chains were rem