Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for January 1st, 1866 AD or search for January 1st, 1866 AD in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 1: introductory and explanatory. (search)
three sums added to the amount paid by the State and towns will make a total of$51,462,760.54 Of the war expenses incurred by the towns, there has been paid (Jan. 1, 1866), by taxation4,457,754.57 Of the same expended by the State there has been paid8,997,345.32 Add private contributions to the recruiting expenses, &c., partly private sources, for all purposes connected with the war, as estimated2,500,000.00 Making a total of$21,407,393.71 Of the war expenses the towns now owe (Jan. 1, 1866) $8,554,112.95 Of the war expenses the State now (Jan. 1, 1866) owes16,379,484.32 Total$25,933,597.27 The amount exhibited, says the Report, undoubJan. 1, 1866) owes16,379,484.32 Total$25,933,597.27 The amount exhibited, says the Report, undoubtedly falls below the actual expenditure. The Legislature of 1863, chapter 218, imposed a tax upon the several cities and towns, with a view of partially equalizing the expenses of the bounties previously paid by them. By this act, many of the towns were made debtors to the larger number; and they paid into the State treasury la
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
Grove Gaylord and Warren Walker were chosen a committee to procure men enough for the military service to clear the town from draft, in anticipation of a future call from the President. The treasurer was authorized to borrow money. 1865. At a town-meeting held on the 6th of March, it was voted to raise twenty-seven hundred dollars, to be paid to those who have paid, or help to pay, commutation-money; and that said money be paid by the treasurer of the town to said persons, on the 1st of January, 1866. New Marlborough furnished, according to the returns made by the town-clerk in 1870, one hundred and fifty-nine men for the war, which, including the men who paid commutation, is about its exact proportion; but which does not include twenty-four men who enlisted in Connecticut regiments, and for which the town received no credit. New Marlborough filled all of its quotas, and at the end of the war had a surplus of twenty-two over and above all demands. Three were commissioned off