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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 918 918 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 332 332 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 96 96 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 47 47 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 44 44 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 33 33 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 30 30 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 22 22 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 21 21 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 20 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1867 AD or search for 1867 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
ee, in his address on Chancellorsville, endeavored to settle the question as to who originated the movement of Jackson's corps to the rear of Hooker, and gave Col. Charles Marshall's account of the matter. Subsequently, in 1886, General A. L. Long, in his Memoirs of R. E. Lee, gave his own recollections of how Jackson's movement originated, and corroborated them by a letter from General Lee to Dr. A. T. Bledsoe, written in October, 1867, and an extract from a personal letter from me. In 1867 an account was published of the Battle of Chancellorsville by Messrs. Allan and Hotchkiss, the former of whom was the Chief of Ordnance of the Second Corps, and the latter also attached to General Jackson's staff, from which I extract the following, which differs materially from Dr. Dabney's account of the conference between Lee and Jackson and other occurrences which preceded the flank movement around Hooker, but accords to General Jackson the strategical conception of the movement of his c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battlefields of Virginia. (search)
son's corps made the detour around Hooker's right flank, but the Route of Jackson's Corps, as indicated by Hotchkiss on the map published with his first account in 1867, was by the Furnace and Brock roads, which were old roads, and were clearly shown on the map of Spotsylvania county, prepared before the Battle of Chancellorsville by Colonel Marshall, and the fact that General Jackson did follow the route indicated by General Lee is fully established not only by Hotchkiss' map, published in 1867, but by official maps, and by General Lee's official report. I have, I think, shown that the evidence is all against Hotchkiss' account of how the movement of Jcially recorded at the time. Third. What General Lee has said precludes the possibility of Jackson's having proposed the movement; for when in 1866 and again in 1867 the opportunity was afforded him to confirm the claim made by Dr. Dabney that General Jackson proposed the movement around Hooker at Chancellorsville, while he sta
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Yankee gunboat Smith Briggs. from the Times-dispatch, March 18, 1906, and July 15, 1906. (search)
red-hot Rebel. Captain Pipkin had on his horse behind him, a boy of your command, some twelve or thirteen years of age, who was a little sassy to her. She recognized him after the war, in the Green House of the Soldier's Home, at Hampton, Va. She was admiring his flowers when there was a mutual recognition. After the surrender of the Smith Briggs she was set on fire, and when the flames reached her magazine, with two tons of powder, she was blown all to pieces. The wreck remained until 1867 or 1868, when it was removed by the general government, or some of its agents. I own and have lived at the lot formerly known as the William Henry Jordan lot, right at the top of Todd's Hill, ever since January I, 1868. I have a memento of the fight of February 1, 1864, in my yard, a cannon-ball right at the front-door step. I found it here, and here it has been ever since. There were some other cannon balls, in the trees and houses about town, but they have all disappeared. Smithf