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Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 4 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 4 4 Browse Search
James Buchanan, Buchanan's administration on the eve of the rebellion 4 4 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 4 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 3 3 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1868 AD or search for 1868 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 299 results in 251 document sections:

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in 1836. In the early part of the Civil War, Union League clubs were established in all the cities and towns in the Northern States, and exerted a powerful influence in maintaining patriotic sentiments in their communities. They partook somewhat of the character of secret and fraternal organizations. A few of the largest and wealthiest ones are still in existence, the others having gradually disbanded a few years after the close of the war. A striking feature of modern club-life in the United States is found in the large and constantly growing number of clubs organized by and for women exclusively. Of these the most conspicuous example is the Sorosis, of New York City, founded in 1868, and claiming to be the first distinctively women's club in the country. The growth of these clubs reached an extent in 1892 which warranted the organization of the Central Federation of Women's Clubs, which has in affiliation with it over 2,700 women's clubs, representing a membership of 200,000.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cobb, Howell 1815-1868 (search)
Cobb, Howell 1815-1868 Statesman; born in Cherry Hill, Jefferson co., Ga., Sept. 7, 1815; was a lawyer by profession, and was solicitor-general of the Western circuit of Georgia from 1837 to 1841; a member of Congress from 1843 to 1851; speaker of the 31st Congress; and governor of Georgia from 1851 to 1853. He was again elected to Congress in 1855, Howell Cobb. and was Secretary of the Treasury under President Buchanan from 1857 to 1860. He was a zealous promoter of the Confederate cause in 1860-61, and was chosen president of the convention at Montgomery, Ala., that organized the Confederate government Feb. 4, 1861. He became a brigadier-general in the Confederate army; and at the close of the war he opposed the reconstruction measures of the national government. He died in New York City, Oct. 9, 1868.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cody, William Frederick 1846- (search)
Cody, William Frederick 1846- Scout; born in Scott county, Ia., Feb. 26, 1846. In 1857-58 he was under contract to supply the Kansas Pacific Railroad with all the buffalo meat needed during its construction, and in eighteen months he killed 4,280 buffaloes, on account of which he received his widely known sobriquet of Buffalo bill. During the Civil War he was a guide and scout for the national government; in 1868-72 was scout and guide in all the movements against the hostile Sioux and Cheyenne Indians; in 1876 was scout of the 5th Cavalry, and in the action at Indian Creek, in a personal encounter, killed Yellow Hand, the Cheyenne chief. He has been in more Indian fights than any other living man. He is coauthor of The Great Salt Lake trail.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Coles, Edward 1786-1868 (search)
Coles, Edward 1786-1868 Governor; born in Albemarle county, Va., Dec. 15, 1786; graduated at William and Mary College in 1807; went to Russia on a confidential diplomatic mission for the United States government in 1817. He removed to Edwardsville, Ill., in 1819, and freed all the slaves which he had inherited, giving to the head of each family 160 acres of land. He was governor of Illinois from 1823 to 1826, and during his term of office he prevented the slavery party from obtaining control of the State. Later he settled in Philadelphia, Pa., and in 1856 read a History of the ordinance of 1787 before the Pennsylvania Historical Society. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., July 7, 1868.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Conger, Edwin Hurd 1843- (search)
Conger, Edwin Hurd 1843- Diplomatist; born in Knox county, Ill., March 7, 1843; graduated at Lombard University, Galesburg, Ill., in 1862; served in the 102d Illinois Regiment in the Civil War from 1862-65; and was brevetted major. After the war he entered the Albany Law School, where he graduated in 1866; practised law in Galesburg, Ill.; and after 1868 was enagaged in banking and stockraising in Iowa. He was State treasurer Edwin Hurd Conger. of Iowa in 1882-85; member of Congress in 1885-91; and minister to Brazil in 1891-95, being reappointed to the latter post in 1897. On Jan. 12, 1898, he was transferred to China, and served in Peking during the critical days of the Boxer uprising in 1900, and the subsequent negotiations for peace and the restoration of order in that country. See China.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Corrigan, Michael Augustine 1839- (search)
Corrigan, Michael Augustine 1839- Clergyman; born in Newark, N. J., Aug. 13, 1839; graduated at Mount St. Mary's College, Emmitsburg, Md., in 1859; Professor of Dogmatic Theology and Sacred Scripture in Seton Hall College, Orange, N. J., in 1864-68; president of the same in 1868-73; became bishop of Newark, N. J., in 1873; coadjutor to Cardinal McCloskey of New York in 1880; and archbishop of New York in 1885. Corrigan, Michael Augustine 1839- Clergyman; born in Newark, N. J., Aug. 13, 1839; graduated at Mount St. Mary's College, Emmitsburg, Md., in 1859; Professor of Dogmatic Theology and Sacred Scripture in Seton Hall College, Orange, N. J., in 1864-68; president of the same in 1868-73; became bishop of Newark, N. J., in 1873; coadjutor to Cardinal McCloskey of New York in 1880; and archbishop of New York in 1885.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cox, Jacob Dolson 1828- (search)
He was admitted to the bar in 1852, and practised in Warren, O., until elected State Senator, in 1859. He was appointed brigadier-general of State militia, and commanded a camp of instruction, in April, 1861, and in May was made brigadier-general of volunteers, doing good service in western Virginia. In August, 1862, he was assigned to the Army of Virginia, under General Pope, and in the fall was ordered to the district of the Kanawha. After the death of Reno, at South Mountain, he commanded the 9th Army Corps. He was in command of the district of Ohio in 1863; served in the Atlanta campaign in 1864; and was promoted to major-general in December of that year. He served in Sherman's army early in 1865; was governor of Ohio in 1866-68; Secretary of the Interior under President Grant, in 1869-70; and Representative in Congress in 1877-79. He published Atlanta; The March to the sea; Franklin and Nashville; The second battle of Bull Run, etc. He died in Magnolia, Mass., Aug. 4, 1900.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cox, Samuel Sullivan 1824-1889 (search)
Cox, Samuel Sullivan 1824-1889 Statesman; born in Zanesville, O., Sept. 30, 1824: graduated at Brown University in 1846: became editor of the Statesman of Columbus, O., in 1853; was a Democratic Representative in Congress from Ohio in 1857-65; and from New York in 1868-82. During his service in Congress he secured an increase of salary for the letter-carriers throughout the country, and also an annual vacation without loss of pay. In 1885-86 he was United States minister to Turkey, and on his return was again elected to Congress. He was a pleasing speaker, writer, and lecturer. Chief among his many publications are Puritanism in politics; Eight years in Congress; Free land and free trade; Three decades of federal legislation; and The diplomat in Turkey. He died in New York City, Sept. 10, 1889.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Craig, Henry Knox 1791-1868 (search)
Craig, Henry Knox 1791-1868 Military officer; born in Pittsburg, Pa., March 7, 1791; entered the army as a lieutenant of artillery in 1812; took part in the occupation of Fort George, and the assault at Stony Creek, Canada; was chief of ordnance of the Army of Occupation in Mexico in 1847, and distinguished himself in the battles of Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma, and Monterey; was chief of the ordnance bureau at Washington in 1851-61; and was retired in 1863. He died in Washington, D. C., Dec. 7, 1868.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Craven, Thomas Tingley 1808-1887 (search)
Craven, Thomas Tingley 1808-1887 Naval officer; born in Washington, D. C., Dec. 30, 1808; entered the United States navy as midshipman in 1822, and was made captain June 7, 1861. A year later he became commodore. He materially assisted in the reduction of the forts on the Mississippi below New Orleans (May, 1862) and the destruction of the Confederate flotilla there. He had been lieutenant-commander of the flag-ship Vincennes in Wilkes's exploring expedition in 1838-42, and was instructor of the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis in 1851-55. In 1866 (Oct. 10) he was made a rear-admiral; in 1868-69 was in command of the North Pacific squadron; and in 1869 was retired. He died in Boston, Aug. 23, 1887.
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