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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1,294 1,294 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 299 299 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 86 86 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 62 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 45 45 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 25 25 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 25 25 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 19 19 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 15 15 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 13 13 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight). You can also browse the collection for 1868 AD or search for 1868 AD in all documents.

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:Peters,1862. Hardy,1869.Selden and Kidd,1865. Murphy,1870.Spencer,1868. Riley,1871.French,1869. Murfey,1870. 7. For forming a radiati Kelly: with graphite and iron-filings,1870. Johns: with caoutchouc,1868. 10. For molded articles:Whitmarsh, 1868. 11. For roofing cement1868. 11. For roofing cement:Johns, 1868. Kidwell, 1868.Moore, 1868. 12. Flooring cement:Whitmarsh, 1867. 13. Electric insulator:English patent, 362 of 1865. 14. I1868. Kidwell, 1868.Moore, 1868. 12. Flooring cement:Whitmarsh, 1867. 13. Electric insulator:English patent, 362 of 1865. 14. In refrigerators:Hyatt, 1870. 15. In ink:Smilie, 1863. 16. For paper:English patent, 1413 of 1853. Johns, 1868. Schaeffer on Paper, an1868.Moore, 1868. 12. Flooring cement:Whitmarsh, 1867. 13. Electric insulator:English patent, 362 of 1865. 14. In refrigerators:Hyatt, 1870. 15. In ink:Smilie, 1863. 16. For paper:English patent, 1413 of 1853. Johns, 1868. Schaeffer on Paper, an old German book, describes asbestus paper, and contains a specimen. 17. For coffins— mixed with clay:1870. 18. For ropes strengthened w1868. 12. Flooring cement:Whitmarsh, 1867. 13. Electric insulator:English patent, 362 of 1865. 14. In refrigerators:Hyatt, 1870. 15. In ink:Smilie, 1863. 16. For paper:English patent, 1413 of 1853. Johns, 1868. Schaeffer on Paper, an old German book, describes asbestus paper, and contains a specimen. 17. For coffins— mixed with clay:1870. 18. For ropes strengthened with other materials,Stevens, 1870 and 1871. 19. For yarn: separated into filaments by alkaline treatment, and then treated like wool: Rose1868. Schaeffer on Paper, an old German book, describes asbestus paper, and contains a specimen. 17. For coffins— mixed with clay:1870. 18. For ropes strengthened with other materials,Stevens, 1870 and 1871. 19. For yarn: separated into filaments by alkaline treatment, and then treated like wool: Rosenthal's patent,1872 As-bestus stove. A stove heated by gas and having asbestus spread over the perforated pipes, in order to obtain an <
on′. One which is tied to the earth by a rope, so as to restrain its ascensive and wandering power. In the summer of 1868 the largest of its kind was exhibited near London; it had a cubic capacity of 300,000 feet, an ascensional power equal to municate the ink to a set of rollers common to all, and by which the type is inked in strips of various colors. Slater, 1868; adjustable parallel inking-tables, each carrying its own color and furnishing it to a belt of corresponding width on the inking-roller. Hunt, 1868; two forms, two impressions, inkrollers with bands of colors. In Dunk's press the sheet is held by the nippers while it receives the colors consecutively. There are two sectional cylinders revolving in unison, one of be deposited in earthenware. Coffins made of slate slabs united by metallic cornerpieces and bolts are described in an 1868 patent. Coffins are rendered impervious to moisture by resins, asphaltum, paraffine, etc. Cogs. A Danish paper st
h a number of instruments at great distances apart, so that they may be caused to play the same tune simultaneously. In 1868, a contrivance on this principle for playing the organ was exhibited in London. It was operated by means of a keyboard, aaving been used by the Russian government for printing bank-notes. A United States patent was granted for this process in 1868. See also Garnier's process, Photographic journal, Vol. VI., p. 31 et seq. An important improvement in electro-platin858. Guerrant and Field's engraving-machine was patented in 1867, and was in operation in New York City during the year 1868. To engrave by means of this machine the operator sits with a copy of the drawing, photograph, or whatever design is to bo a graver, which cuts or engraves the design upon the surface of a copper plate or block. At the Paris Exposition of 1868, an apparatus was exhibited by M. Gaiffe, of Paris, for engraving by electro-magnetism. It consists of two or more disks
65. 60,832A. A. ChassepotJan. 1, 1867. 63,217J. W. CochranMar. 26, 1867. 63,303Thomas RestellMar. 26, 1867. 65,509E. K. RootJune 4, 1867. 73,351H. LordJan 14, 1868. 74,387H. LordFeb. 11, 1868. 1. (b.) Withdrawn by Hand, etc.—Continued. No.Name.Date. 75,627J. W. CochranMar. 17, 1868. 78,603S. Morris, W. and P. Macertaining the ingredients of various patented fulminates: — Guthrie1834.Boldt1866. Kling1857.Rand1867. Ruschaupt et al.1862.Goldmark1867. Lipps1864.Ruschaupt1868. Stockwell1865. Fumi-ga′tor. An apparatus for applying smoke, gas, or perfume: — 1. To destroy insects or vermin in their holes, or upon clothing, treesixed knives in succession. Flint's fur-cutting knife, 1837, has an edge on one jaw and a cushion on the other. See also Harlow's patent for cutting bristles, 1868. 2. A mechanical contrivance for shaving the backs of peltry skins, to loosen the long, deeply rooted hairs, leaving the fine fur undisturbed. Fur-dress
being used for pumps. Linnaker's hydraulic propeller, 1808, had pumps placed horizontally beneath the bottom of the vessel. The pistons were attached to hanging levers which were oscillated by the power of the steam-engine. The pistons reciprocated in longitudinal trunks parallel to the keel. In a second plan, the pumps were vertical and discharged the water through horizontal trunks. The Nautilus, furnished with Ruthven's propeller, had a trial trip on the Thames in the summer of 1868, running in company with paddle-wheel steamers of the class that ply like aquatic omnibuses up and down the river. She ran at the rate of 13.5 and 7.2 miles per hour, with and against the tide, respectively, or at an average speed of 10.35 miles per hour. She then steamed down the river, and when off the Tunnel pier, with both strong wind and tide in her favor, going at full speed, was made, by reversing the valves, to stop dead in less than ten seconds and in about a quarter of her length.
s subject; the figures are day, month, year: — Welling4, 8, 1857.Seeley23, 6, 1868. Held4, 8, 1857.Welling5, 5, 1868. Hackert31, 5, 1864.Cradenwitz25, 5, 1869. 1868. Hackert31, 5, 1864.Cradenwitz25, 5, 1869. Dupper1865.Hyatt and Blake4, 5, 1869. Wheeler14, 11, 1865.Welling20, 4, 1869. Wurtz1, 1, 1867.Welling27, 4, 1869. Hackert19, 2, 1867.Welling27, 4, 1869. Starr3, 3, 1868.Hyatt6, 4, 1869. Starr and Welling9, 6, 1868.Hyatt6, 4, 1869. Hyatt14, 4, 1868.Hyatt15, 6, 1869. Gardner7, 1, 1868.Welling17, 1, 1870. I′vo-ry-black. 1868.Hyatt6, 4, 1869. Hyatt14, 4, 1868.Hyatt15, 6, 1869. Gardner7, 1, 1868.Welling17, 1, 1870. I′vo-ry-black. A species of bone-black made by the calcination of ivory scraps, turnings, and sawdust. It is used as a pigment in the manufacture of paints and printers' ink. I1868.Hyatt15, 6, 1869. Gardner7, 1, 1868.Welling17, 1, 1870. I′vo-ry-black. A species of bone-black made by the calcination of ivory scraps, turnings, and sawdust. It is used as a pigment in the manufacture of paints and printers' ink. I′vo-ry-pa′per. A superior article of pasteboard, with a finely prepared polished surface, used by artists. Ainslie's process for making ivory-paper is as follow1868.Welling17, 1, 1870. I′vo-ry-black. A species of bone-black made by the calcination of ivory scraps, turnings, and sawdust. It is used as a pigment in the manufacture of paints and printers' ink. I′vo-ry-pa′per. A superior article of pasteboard, with a finely prepared polished surface, used by artists. Ainslie's process for making ivory-paper is as follows: — Digest four ounces of clean parchment cuttings in water for four hours, and strain off the jelly. Digest again for a farther quantity. Keep the
ks are also closed with a bridge-piece and screw. Lid-winding watch. Lid-wind′--ing watch. One in which the opening of the lid, as occurring several times during the day, is made to wind up the going mechanism. In the patent of Ramuz, 1868, the cover is connected to a lever which is operated by opening and closing the cover, and acts through a gimbal-joint upon a lever to which a curved ratchet-bar is pivoted. The curved ratchet-bar engages a ratchetwheel, which communicates with t may be regarded as furnishing an illustration of the essential features of them all. The introduction of the lithographic power-press has totally remodeled the lithographic trade throughout the world within the short period of four years (from 1868-72), increasing the possible production about tenfold. It has lowered the cost of, and, in fact, rendered possible, large editions from stone, which, in former times, found their way to the typepress with very inferior results. By this change th
ustrous, and vice versa. The following United States patents may be consulted: — No. 57,271, Adams, 1866No. 87,385, Winchester, 1869. No. 82,877, Remington, 1868.No. 90,332, Adams, 1869. No. 90,476, Adams, 1869.No. 102,748, Adams, 1870. No. 92,337, Moore, 1869.No. 103,201, Kuhus, 1870. No. 93,157, Adams, 1869.No. 106, 1866.No. 98,427, Shaffner, 1869. No. 60,572, Shaffner, 1866.No. 98,854, Ditmar, 1870. No. 60,573, Shaffner, 1866.No. 99,069, Ditmar, 1870. No. 76,499, Mowbray, 1868.No. 99,070, Ditmar, 1870. No. 78,317, Nobel, 1868.No. 106,606, Mowbray, 1870. No. 85,906, Chester and Burstenbinder, 1869No. 106,607, Mowbray, 1870. No. 86,701,1868.No. 106,606, Mowbray, 1870. No. 85,906, Chester and Burstenbinder, 1869No. 106,607, Mowbray, 1870. No. 86,701, Shaffner, 1869.No. 112,848, Roberts, 1871. No. 87,372, Shaffner, 1869.No. 112,849, Roberts, 1871. No. 93,752, Shaffner, 1869.No. 112,850, Roberts, 1871. No. 93,753, Shaffner, 1869.No. 117,577, Taylor, 1871. No. 93,754, Shaffner, 1869.No. 120,776, Roberts, 1871. Ni-tro′le-um. A name for nitro-glycerine (which see). N
articles of molded pulp In Smith's machine, 1868, the paper-pulp box is made by the sudden descere oblique presentation of the pen. Holland (1868) has a pair of pens stocked together for rulingg-rollers and then through lubricant. 555 of 1868. Interior of hemp, jute, etc., covered with cog machine; then through paraffine. 73,454 of 1868. Wire or vegetable fiber, braided one over the other, with lubricants between. 77,275 of 1868. Lubricant of stearine, powdered soapstone, etc.ng while being twisted or braided. 77,902 of 1868. Yarn run from reels through a vat of oil, wax,nia. Dry by gentle heat, pulverize. Seeley, 1868, adds nitro-glucose to gun-cotton in solution. s patents:— 65,267.Pierson1867. 79,261.Seely1868. 77,304.McClelland1868. 90,765.McClelland18691868. 90,765.McClelland1869. 90,766.McClelland1869. 96,132.McClelland1869. 3,777.McClelland1869. 3,778.McClelland1869. 88,49of 1860. 1,129of 1867. 2,666of 1867. 536of 1868. 3,984of 1868. 3,102of 1869. Pyx. A bo[9 more...]
; silicate of magnesia; linseed-oil, 1 gallon; litharge, 3 pounds. Hutchings, 1868. Rosin, 1 pound; leached ashes, 1 pound; whiting, 0.5 pound; salt, 0.5 pound; red-lead, 0.12 pound; linseed-oil, 0.12 pound. Irish, 1868. Gypsum, 10 pounds; water, 1 gallon; linseedoil, 0.5 pint; white-lead, 0.08 pound; turpentine, 1 ounce. Hinman, 1868. Coal-tar, 1 barrel; glycerine, 2 gallons; oil, 2 quarts; caoutchouc, dissolved, 3 pints. Capron, 1868. Coal-tar, 40 gallons; acetate lead, 5 pou1868. Coal-tar, 40 gallons; acetate lead, 5 pound; Japan varnish, 2 gallons; caoutchouc, 4 pounds; shellac, 4 pounds; linseed-oil, 2 gallons; turpentine, 2 gallons; alcohol, 2 gallons. Hutchings, 1869. Rosin, , just before entering between the finishingrollers. No. 77,111, Shaw, 21, 4, 1868. The heated iron, or the rolls, are mopped with a composition of graphite, animal fat, soda, and water. No. 81,903, Hinsdale, 8, 9, 1868. The bar-iron is scaled; washed; dipped in a bath of clay 100, lampblack 1, prussiate of potash .5; heat
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