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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1,294 1,294 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 299 299 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 86 86 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 62 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 45 45 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 25 25 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 25 25 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 19 19 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 15 15 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 13 13 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1868 AD or search for 1868 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Heroes of the old Camden District, South Carolina, 1776-1861. an Address to the Survivors of Fairfield county, delivered at Winnsboro, S. C., September 1,1888. (search)
cestor, Colonel Bratton of the Revolution, planned and successfully carried out the attack upon the British Captain Houk at the Williamson residence in 1780. Worthy son of heroic sire, it was indeed your fortune, survivors of the Sixth, to have been led by so gallant and able an officer and so pure and true a citizen. The Sixth was next engaged at the battle of Williamsburg, May 5, 1862. General Bratton, in an account published in the Southern Historical Society Papers, which he wrote in 1868, after all his great experience on so many battlefields during the rest of the war, writes of his old regiment on that occasion: I have never on any field during the war seen more splendid gallantry exhibited than on that field of Williamsburg. He adds, This was the first and last time I ever asked for a place in a chargeā€”a pardonable folly I hope at that stage of the war. Vol. XIII, Southern Historical Society Papers, p. 119. Then came the battle of Seven Pines, in which the Sixth wa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Old South. (search)
ies had been thoroughly surveyed. Then discovery ceased, and it was said that there were no more continents, no more islands, no more coral reefs, no more sand-bars to be found in all the wide waste of waters. This lull in discovery ceased until 1868, when an enterprising brother from somewhere north of Mason & Dixon's line announced to the startled world that he had discovered a hitherto unknown region of vast extent, with fertile soil, varied and wonderful products, the loveliest scenery and they were Christian or heathen. The great navigator had called his discovery the New World, and other navigators had called theirs New Caledonia, New Zealand, New Britain, New Hebrides, New Holland, etc.; this land navigator of the year of grace 1868, called his discovery the New South. The thing stranger to me than even finding this hitherto unknown land is, that the English-speaking race discovered there have adopted the name given them, are proud of it, brag about it, and roll it as a sw