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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1,294 1,294 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 299 299 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 86 86 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 62 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 45 45 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 25 25 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 25 25 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 19 19 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 15 15 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 13 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1868 AD or search for 1868 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of General Jackson (search)
fever, contracted in the campaign on Big Sewell Mountain. My brother wrote me of General Lee's desire to have the horse and asked me what he should do. I replied at once: If he will not accept it, then sell it to him at what it cost me. He then sold the horse to General Lee for $200 in currency, the sum of $25 having been added by General Lee to the price I gave for the horse in September, 1861, to make up for the depreciation in our currency from September, 1861, to February, 1862. In 1868 General Lee wrote to my brother stating that his horse had survived the war and was known as Traveller (spelling the word with a double l in good English style), and asking for its pedigree, which was obtained as above mentioned and sent by my brother to General Lee. Thomas L. Broun. Charleston, W. Va., August, 1886. From Gen. Fitzhuigh Lees book on Gen. Robert E. Lee, 1894. Traveller, the most distinguished of the General's warhorses, was born near Blue Sulphur Springs, in West Virgi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General R. E Lee's war-horse: a sketch of Traveller by the man who formerly owned him. (search)
ther) would not sell, please keep the horse, with many thanks. This was in February, 1862. At that time I was in Virginia on the sick list from a long and severe attack of camp fever, contracted in the campaign on Big Sewell Mountain. My brother wrote me of General Lee's desire to have the horse and asked me what he should do. I replied at once: If he will not accept it, then sell it to him at what it cost me. He then sold the horse to General Lee for $200 in currency, the sum of $25 having been added by General Lee to the price I gave for the horse in September, 1861, to make up for the depreciation in our currency from September, 1861, to February, 1862. In 1868 General Lee wrote to my brother stating that his horse had survived the war and was known as Traveller (spelling the word with a double l in good English style), and asking for its pedigree, which was obtained as above mentioned and sent by my brother to General Lee. Thomas L. Broun. Charleston, W. Va., August, 1886.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The cruise of the Shenandoah. (search)
to the Richmond government. These dispatches were taken through the blockade and delivered, and he was sent back to the commissioners with return dispatches. In October, 1864, he was ordered as executive officer of the C. S. S. Shenandoah, and after her unique cruise surrendered to the British Government in Liverpool, Eng., in November, 1865. In December, 1865, he went to Buenos Ayres, and remained in the Argentine Confederation until 1867, when he returned to his home in Virginia. In 1868 he was appointed captain of one of the Bay Line steamers between Baltimore and Norfolk and Portsmouth. He served in that capacity until 1890, when he resigned to become superintendent of the floating equipment of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Company. After this fleet was sold, in 1901, he assisted, in 1902, in organizing the Virginia Bank and Trust Company, of which he became cashier, and is now a vice president and a director.—W. H. Stewart. From time immemorial one of the most eff
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
ker, survive him. Colonel McCreary. James B. McCreary was born in Madison County, Ky., July 8, 1839; graduated when eighteen years old at Center College, in 1859 graduated in the law department of Cumberland University, Tenn., with first honors in a class of forty-seven members, and at once began the practice of law in Richmond. After his capture at Cheshire, Ohio., he was incarcerated in the Ohio penitentiary, and afterwards at Fort Delaware, Del., and later at Morris Island, S. C. In 1868 he was elected a delegate to the National Democratic Convention, held in New York; elected a member of the House of Representatives of Kentucky in 1869, 1871 and 1873, and was Speaker of the House in 1871 and 1873; elected Governor of Kentucky in 1875, and served to 1879; was appointed, under an act of Congress, by the President of the United States, and served as a delegate to the International Monetary Conference held at Brussells, Belgium, in 1892, where twenty nations were represented; wa