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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 6 Browse Search
Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 2 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 2 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 1 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 1 1 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 1 1 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for January, 1868 AD or search for January, 1868 AD in all documents.

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rom July 22, 1864, and on the 30th Lieutenant-Colonel Morse of that regiment, being field officer of the day, surprised the enemy's pickets in his front and captured them in their rifle-pits. The regiment was then ordered to the support of the picket line and hastily threw up breastworks. They were within two hundred yards of the enemy's forts, and under a close and hot fire of his artillery, infantry and sharpshooters. Colonel Cogswell's own narrative, in Adjutant General's Report, January, 1868, p. 213. Here the regiment remained for six hours, resisting successfully severalefforts of the enemy to retake the hill where they were posted, having expended two hundred rounds of ammunition per man. They were relieved at last by another regiment of the same brigade, the 3d New Jersey, with a loss of 4 killed and mortally wounded. On the fall of Atlanta, Sept. 2, 1864, the regiment was placed on duty as provost guard, Colonel Cogswell being placed in command of the fort. At Averys