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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 333 333 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 182 182 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 131 131 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 51 51 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 39 39 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 33 33 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 24 24 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 22 22 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 21 21 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 13 13 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for 1869 AD or search for 1869 AD in all documents.

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e of his character most remarked by his contemporaries was, in his early boyhood, an energy that made him an acknowledged leader among his comrades; later, it was a self-contained dignity and reserved power that subjected affections, will, and passions, to the performance of duty. His eldest sister says of him that, when he was a boy, he was fearless and impetuous; but kind, affectionate, and just; amenable to reason, and deferential to age. Mr. J. G. Hickman, of Maysville, writing in 1869, after consulting all the old folk, says: My aunt and Mr. Lashbrooke remember General Johnston from his infancy; and they say, as indeed all say, that there was great promise about him from his childhood. He was a handsome, proud, manly, earnest, and self-reliant boy; and his success and distinction in after-life were only what were expected of him by those who knew him in his boyhood. Mr. Lashbrooke says he went to the same school with him, in 1811, to Mann Butler, a teacher of some di
d that Colonel Piedras had called in and employed Indians, in his meditated warfare on their rights ; and had insulted them by saying that he held Americans and Indians in the same estimation, and as standing on the same footing. Texas Almanac, 1869, p. 39. The Colonization Act of March 24, 1825, admitted Indians as settlers, when any of them, after having first declared themselves in favor of our religion and institutions, wish to establish themselves in any settlements that are forming. by law, with very little inconvenience to themselves and no derangement of the public business beyond its temporary suspension. President Lamar's message, 1839. The venerable Dr. Starr, then Secretary of the Treasury, writing to the author, in 1869, says: We there took position on the very verge of the territory in our actual possession, the Comanches disputing our advance by frequent raids into the immediate vicinity of the capital. There your father and I had our rooms in the same double
cated at Annapolis, and was an officer in the United States Navy up to the breaking out of the war, when he resigned his position in the navy and returned to his native State, Tennessee, to offer his services in her behalf. He served during the war as chief of artillery to Buckner, and afterward to Cleburne, and was wounded at Hoover's Gap. He subsequently entered the Confederate Navy as executive officer of the Florida. After the war he commanded a California merchant-steamer, and died in 1869. He was a kind and cultivated gentleman, and a gallant soldier. His young lieutenant, Morton, before the close of the war became chief of artillery to General Forrest. Darkness separated the combatants. Jordan, in his Life of Forrest (page 86), calls the works gained, the mere narrow foothold seized on the extreme right of the trenches. Buckner, however, considered it the key to his position, which it probably was. The loss of Lauman's brigade, exclusive of the Fifty-second India