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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 333 333 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 182 182 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 131 131 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 51 51 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 39 39 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 33 33 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 24 24 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 22 22 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 21 21 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 13 13 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight). You can also browse the collection for 1869 AD or search for 1869 AD in all documents.

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he lamp boils briskly, denotes the percentage of alcohol in it. Siemen's alcoholmeter, Berlin, 1869, is thus described: As the spirit — no matter of what strength — leaves the still, it passes intoy other. 1. Safes, lining for: W. Marr, English, 1834. Hyatt, several patents, United States, 1869-70. 2. Lamp-wick:British patents: 2071 of 1853.145 of 1857. 2647 of 1855.1610 of 1863. Lord Cochrane,1818. 3. Absorbent in lamps:Boyd, 1869. Beschke,1866. in carburetors:Bassett,1862. 4. Fire-brick and crucibles:Peters,1862. English patent 2318 of 1862, asbestos, fireclay, and gra with hair:Murphey,1870. loose flock asbestus;Hoke. 6. Boiler covering:Peters,1862. Hardy,1869.Selden and Kidd,1865. Murphy,1870.Spencer,1868. Riley,1871.French,1869. Murfey,1870. 7. Fo1869. Murfey,1870. 7. For forming a radiating surface, as in gasstoves, fire-grates, and broilers. 8. In porcelain manufactures, of teeth especially, placed on the side of a muffle to isolate the biscuit from the slide, t
t. 23,1866; reissued May 7, ‘72. h.McCOMB,1850. i.Cook,March 2,1858. k.Brodie,March 22,1859. l.beard,Oct. 16,1866. m.Jordan,Aug.28,1870. n.Morris,April6,1869. o.Adams,Feb.20,1872. p.Peyton,July18,1871. q.Lecky,Oct.29,1867. r.Sechler,March19,1867. s.Sheppard,Aug.22,1871. t.Latting,Dec.18,1866. u.Onions,June5,1866.n, feet on the track, etc., for arresting the motion of the cars. The Westinghouse Atmospheric Brake, illustrated by the folding plate opposite, was patented in 1869, and has been adopted on many railway lines in the United States and in Europe. Its chief features are, first, the use of compressed atmospheric air as a means oft of the pan. The following United States patents may be consulted:— Guiteau1842.Garrison1862. Hull1855.Hull1863. Humphreys1856.Farrar1863. Heims1859.Platt1869. Pratt1862.Gilson1870. Chapin1862.Howarth1871. Brine-pump. (Steam-engine.) A pump worked by the engines to withdraw the super-salted water from the boil<
. Coffee-pots having arrangements for condensing the steam and the essential oil, — which constitutes the aroma of the coffee, — and returning them to the infusion. An early arrangement of this kind is the Bencini patent, September 27, 1838. See also Martell's patent, 1825; Rowland, 1844; Waite and Sener, Old Dominion, 1856. These have lids or upper chambers to condense the steam. 3. Coffee-pots of peculiar construction, as: — Hotte, 1870; a furnace inside the coffee-pot. Manning, 1869; an earthenware lining to a metallic pot. Gibson, 1871; a flat breast to prevent lateral tilting when the pot is tipped forward. Suspended on journals over a lamp and tipped on its bearings. A strainer suspended from the spout. Hot-water jacket. Iron heater in reservoir; the urn. Divided chambers for tea and coffee, or coffee and water. A piston to compress the ground and expel the infusion. A piston to eject water in desired quantities from the water reservoir into th<
uch from his right hand, and breathes with difficulty; his extremities are cold and neck painful. Twice he nearly faints and ceases to breathe. His sight appears troubled, everything turns round with him, and his gaze has no steadiness. This, as the idiom shows, is the French account, and is preferably given without impairing its graphic character. The conclusion arrived at on this occasion was, that it was impracticable to work for any length of time at a depth exceeding 130 feet. In 1869, however, the ship Hamilla Mitchell was lost on the Leuconia rocks, near Shanghai; and two English divers, provided with the apparatus of Siebe and Gorman, were subsequently sent from Liverpool to attempt the rescue of the treasure on board. One of these succeeded in remaining four consecutive hours under water at the depth of 23 fathoms upon one occasion, during which he recovered 64 boxes of specie. The engraving on the opposite page illustrates submarine operations at the anchorage off
ase, the quantity of wheat lifted on these swift-running belts is 225 bushels. The established weight of a bushel of No. 2 Milwaukee Spring is 55 pounds. This would make the total lift of the receiving elevators during the time they are at work over 12,000 pounds. The bins in which this wheat is poured are of great size, being 60 feet deep, 20 wide, and 10 across, containing 12,000 cubic feet. The total receiving and storing capacity of this building is 1,500,000 bushels. Of the crop of 1869 it received 7,000,000 bushels. About 10,000 bushels are taken into a train of the average length; so 2,100 trains were that year rolled into this elevator and discharged. In discharging on to the Lake grain-vessels, as soon as a ship is anchored beside an elevator the hatches are removed and great spouts extend over them from the bottom of one of the bins described. The gate is raised, and a torrent of wheat pours down. The loading power of these spouts is 12,000 bushels an hour. A ve
,428J. RiderFeb. 11, 1868. 74,760B. H. JenksFeb. 25, 1868. 76,595J. BroughtonApr. 14, 1868. 89,699A. C. StevensMay. 4, 1869. 91,421L. ConroyJune. 15, 1869. 92,393J. T. StoakesJuly. 6, 1869. 104,211G. W. SchofieldJune 14, 1870. 104,387J. M. Wh1869. 92,393J. T. StoakesJuly. 6, 1869. 104,211G. W. SchofieldJune 14, 1870. 104,387J. M. WhittemoreJune 14, 1870. 111,814M. J. ChamberlainFeb. 14, 1871. 112,505Smith and ChamberlainMar. 7, 1871. 112,694W. C. and P. T. DodgeApr. 4, 1871. 112,997E. WhitneyMar. 21, 1871. 113,408W. C. DodgeApr. 4, 1871. 113,470Tresing and GernerApr. 4, 11869. 104,211G. W. SchofieldJune 14, 1870. 104,387J. M. WhittemoreJune 14, 1870. 111,814M. J. ChamberlainFeb. 14, 1871. 112,505Smith and ChamberlainMar. 7, 1871. 112,694W. C. and P. T. DodgeApr. 4, 1871. 112,997E. WhitneyMar. 21, 1871. 113,408W. C. DodgeApr. 4, 1871. 113,470Tresing and GernerApr. 4, 1871. 114,742J. YglesiasMay. 9, 1871. 115,997Eli WhitneyJune. 13, 1871. 116,106W. S. SmootJune 20, 1871. 116,363W. T. SneddenJune 27, 1871. 116,364W. T. SneddenJune 27, 1871. 117,906James M. MasonAug. 8, 1871. *118,152J. RiderAug. 15, 1871. 868. 85,350J. AdamsDec. 29, 1868. †93,572R. WhiteAug. 10, 1869. †93,653R. WhiteAug. 10, 1869. †94,003C. A. KingAug 24, 1869. 97,780F. A. Le MatDec. 14, 1869. †99,505R. WhiteFeb. 1, 1870. †99,690J. M. MarlinFeb. 8, 1870. 99,693J. C. MillerF
d by levers within a curb, and a weight suspended from the ends of the levers counterpoises the gun, carriage, chassis, and platform. Callender and Northrup, 1864, have a platform supported by a piston in an air-cylinder beneath. Eads (1865, 1869, and 1871) causes the recoil of the gun to depress it backwardly and downwardly, it being poised on its trunnions on the end of an arm which oscillates in an are. As the gun descends, a piston traverses in a cylinder, compressing air therein, and nd cylinder beneath. Houel and Caillet have a system of levers which oscillate backwardly by the recoil, and in so doing bring into action a spring which afterward assists in restoring the gun to firing position. See also Coon, 1863; Foster, 1869. Wappich, 1863, has a toggle-joint and screw for elevation and depression. Also screws beneath the trunnions. In Moncrieff's gun-carriage (Fig. 2341) the gun is supported upon a moving fulcrum, which, on the firing of the gun, is caused to
857.Welling5, 5, 1868. Hackert31, 5, 1864.Cradenwitz25, 5, 1869. Dupper1865.Hyatt and Blake4, 5, 1869. Wheeler14, 11, 1861869. Wheeler14, 11, 1865.Welling20, 4, 1869. Wurtz1, 1, 1867.Welling27, 4, 1869. Hackert19, 2, 1867.Welling27, 4, 1869. Starr3, 3, 1868.Hyatt6, 1869. Wurtz1, 1, 1867.Welling27, 4, 1869. Hackert19, 2, 1867.Welling27, 4, 1869. Starr3, 3, 1868.Hyatt6, 4, 1869. Starr and Welling9, 6, 1868.Hyatt6, 4, 1869. Hyatt14, 4, 1868.Hyatt15, 6, 1869. Gardner7, 1, 1868.Welling17, 1, 1869. Hackert19, 2, 1867.Welling27, 4, 1869. Starr3, 3, 1868.Hyatt6, 4, 1869. Starr and Welling9, 6, 1868.Hyatt6, 4, 1869. Hyatt14, 4, 1868.Hyatt15, 6, 1869. Gardner7, 1, 1868.Welling17, 1, 1870. I′vo-ry-black. A species of bone-black made by the calcination of ivory scraps, turnings, and sawdust. It is u1869. Starr3, 3, 1868.Hyatt6, 4, 1869. Starr and Welling9, 6, 1868.Hyatt6, 4, 1869. Hyatt14, 4, 1868.Hyatt15, 6, 1869. Gardner7, 1, 1868.Welling17, 1, 1870. I′vo-ry-black. A species of bone-black made by the calcination of ivory scraps, turnings, and sawdust. It is used as a pigment in the manufacture of paints and printers' ink. I′vo-ry-pa′per. A superior article of pasteboard, wit1869. Starr and Welling9, 6, 1868.Hyatt6, 4, 1869. Hyatt14, 4, 1868.Hyatt15, 6, 1869. Gardner7, 1, 1868.Welling17, 1, 1870. I′vo-ry-black. A species of bone-black made by the calcination of ivory scraps, turnings, and sawdust. It is used as a pigment in the manufacture of paints and printers' ink. I′vo-ry-pa′per. A superior article of pasteboard, with a finely prepared polished surface, used by artists. Ainslie's process for making ivory-paper is as follows: — Diges1869. Hyatt14, 4, 1868.Hyatt15, 6, 1869. Gardner7, 1, 1868.Welling17, 1, 1870. I′vo-ry-black. A species of bone-black made by the calcination of ivory scraps, turnings, and sawdust. It is used as a pigment in the manufacture of paints and printers' ink. I′vo-ry-pa′per. A superior article of pasteboard, with a finely prepared polished surface, used by artists. Ainslie's process for making ivory-paper is as follows: — Digest four ounces of clean parchment cuttings in water for four hours, and strain off the jelly. Digest again for a farther qua1869. Gardner7, 1, 1868.Welling17, 1, 1870. I′vo-ry-black. A species of bone-black made by the calcination of ivory scraps, turnings, and sawdust. It is used as a pigment in the manufacture of paints and printers' ink. I′vo-ry-pa′per. A superior article of pasteboard, with a finely prepared polished surface, used by artists. Ainslie's process for making ivory-paper is as follows: — Digest four ounces of clean parchment cuttings in water for four hours, and strain off the jelly. Digest again for a farther quantity. Keep these apart as Nos. 1 and 2. Saturate with No. 2 two sheets of drawing-paper, 15 × 1
frame of 360 plane mirrors, 8 × 6 inches; and one of 400 mirrors, 6 × 6 inches. Wood was kindled at 210 feet distance, tin melted at 160 feet. See burning-glass. Petijean's patent (1856) is for a process of silvering by the use of a compound formed of nitrate of silver, ammonia, and tartaric acid. The solution is applied to a polished glass, and silver is precipitated to the amount of about one pennyweight to each square foot of glass. It is then protected by a dark varnish. Walker (1869) uses the same ingredients in somewhat different proportions. The surface of the glass is thoroughly polished with whiting and washed with distilled water, when the plate is heated to about 120°, and the solution applied. After the silver is precipitated and dried, the plate is varnished with shellac, and then painted with a compound of red lead and litharge to protect the coating of silver. See silvering; Platinizing; looking-glass. Mi′ser. A large auger for excavating earth in wet
7, 271, 1866, coats gastips with nickel. Same, 1869, uses solution of sulphate of nickel in solutio No. 82,877, Remington, 1868.No. 90,332, Adams, 1869. No. 90,476, Adams, 1869.No. 102,748, Adams1869.No. 102,748, Adams, 1870. No. 92,337, Moore, 1869.No. 103,201, Kuhus, 1870. No. 93,157, Adams, 1869.No. 106,823, Howard, 1870. No. 95,053, Smith, 1869.No. 109,475, Watrous, 1870. No. 98,006, Adams, 1869.No. 113,612, Adams, 1871. No. 98,354, Crooke, 1869.No. 114 191, Parmalce, 1871. No. 100,038, Howard, 1870.No.. 93,756, Shaffner, 1869. No. 98,382, Horsley, 1869. No. 56,620, Shaffner, 1863.No. 98,425, Shaffner, 1869. No. 57,175, Nobel, 1866.No. 98,426, Shaffner, 1869. No. 60,567, Shaffner, 1866.No. 98,42 112,849, Roberts, 1871. No. 93,752, Shaffner, 1869.No. 112,850, Roberts, 1871. No. 93,753, Shaffner, 1869.No. 117,577, Taylor, 1871. No. 93,754, Shaffner, 1869.No. 120,776, Roberts, 1871. Ni-tinterpretation of the physical law invoked. In 1869, however, the lines of the sixteenth, seventeen[12 more...]
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