hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 304 304 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 99 99 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 50 50 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 48 48 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 41 41 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 25 25 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. 25 25 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 16 16 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 15 15 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 15 15 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 1870 AD or search for 1870 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, FORUM (ROMANUM S. MAGNUM) (search)
ted in the way of scientific excavation until the end of the eighteenth century, when a part of the basilica Iulia was laid bare, but incorrectly identified. In 1803 Fea began by clearing the arch of Severus, and the work was continued by the French, the temples of Saturn and Vespasian being isolated, and the column of Phocas cleared; the temples of Castor and Concord followed. The work was continued in 1827-36, and the isolated excavations connected; but very little more was done until after 1870, when the work was taken in hand seriously (though at first with too little regard to the late classical period, see LR 244-245), and the forum and Sacra via cleared from the Tabularium to the arch of Titus. Work stopped again in 1885, and was not resumed again until 1898, when extensive excavations were begun by Boni and carried to the lowest strata at many points over the whole area. In this connection a passage in LR 240, written in 1897, just before Boni's excavations began, should be quo
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PORTA SALARIA (search)
sari/a, as Jordan notes, may equally well mean Porta Pinciana. In GMU 87; R. ii. 405, it is called Porta Sancti Silvestri, because it led to the catacombs of S. Priscilla, where he was buried, though Magister Gregorius gives it under its correct name (JRS 1919, 19, 46). It was flanked by two semi-circular towers of brickwork, that of the west tower being perhaps the original work of Aurelian, below which were tombs faced with marble, wrongly described by Nibby (Mura di Roma 321) as bastions. The arch was of stone, with a brick arcade repaired in opus mixtum above it. It was seriously damaged in the capture of Rome in 1870; and the removal of its remains led to the discovery under the eastern tower of the tomb of Q. Sulpicius Maximus (see SEPULCRUM Q. SULPICII MAXIMI); while under the western tower was the round tomb of Cornelia L. Scipionis f. Vatieni (CIL vi. 1296). The modern gate, built in 1873, was removed in 1921 (Jord. i. I. 354; T iii. 10-11; PBS iii. II; Mitt. 1908, 286-290).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, THERMAE CONSTANTINIANAE (search)
the building (see especially Serlio, Architettura iii. 92; Ed. 1550; in those of 1544 and 1562 the reference is iii. 88. In all these thermae are wrongly ascribed to Titus. Palladio, Le Terme, pl. xiv.; Duperac, Vestigii, pl. 32; LS iii. 196-197; Ant. van den Wyngaerde, BC 1895, pls. vi.-xiii.; HJ 439, n. 131). The remains were almost entirely destroyed in 1605-1621, when the Palazzo Rospigliosi was built, but some traces were found a century later (BC 1895, 88; HJ 440, n. 133), and since 1870 (NS 1876, 55, 99; 1877, 204, 267; 1878, 233, 340). The baths were oriented north and south (see LF 16) with one principal entrance in the middle of the north side. As the main structure occupied all the space between the streets on the east and west, the ordinary peribolus was replaced by an enclosure that extended across the front and was bounded on the north by a curved line, an area now occupied by the Palazzo della Consulta. The other principal entrance was on the west side, where a magni