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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 304 304 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 99 99 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 50 50 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 48 48 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 41 41 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 25 25 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. 25 25 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 15 15 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 15 15 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1870 AD or search for 1870 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 304 results in 263 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Brooks, 1848- (search)
Adams, Brooks, 1848- Author; born in Quincy, Mass., June 24, 1848: son of Charles Francis; was graduated at Harvard College in 1870; spent a year in the law school there; was secretary to his father while the latter was serving as an arbitrator on the Alabama Claims, under the Treaty of Washington; and after his return from Geneva he was admitted to the bar and practised till 1881, when he began applying himself chiefly to literature. Besides numerous articles in magazines and other periodicals, he has published The emancipation of Massachusetts, The law of civilization and decay, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Henry, 1838- (search)
- Historian; born in Boston, Mass., Feb. 16, 1838; third son of Charles Francis, st; was graduated at Harvard College in 1858; acted as private secretary to his father while the latter was American minister to Great Britain, in 1861-68; was Associate Professor of History at Harvard in 1870-77; and editor of the North American review in 1870-76. His principal works are, Historical essays; Documents relating to New England Federalism; History of the United States from 1801 to 1817 (9 volumes).- Historian; born in Boston, Mass., Feb. 16, 1838; third son of Charles Francis, st; was graduated at Harvard College in 1858; acted as private secretary to his father while the latter was American minister to Great Britain, in 1861-68; was Associate Professor of History at Harvard in 1870-77; and editor of the North American review in 1870-76. His principal works are, Historical essays; Documents relating to New England Federalism; History of the United States from 1801 to 1817 (9 volumes).
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adler, Felix, 1851- (search)
Adler, Felix, 1851- Educator; born in Alzey, Germany, Aug. 13, 1851; was graduated at Columbia University in 1870 and then studied in Germany. In 1874-76 he was Professor of Hebrew and Oriental Literature at Cornell University; and in 1876 he founded the New York Society of Ethical Culture, before which he has since lectured on Sundays. On May 5, 1901, at its twenty-fifth anniversary, in recognition of Dr. Adler's services, the society presented him with $10.000 as a nucleus of a larger fund the income of which is to be employed in developing the natural gifts of worthy young men and women. Dr. Adler is a member of the editorial board of the International journal of Ethics. His publications include Creed and deed; The moral instruction of children, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Aguinaldo, Emilio, 1870- (search)
Aguinaldo, Emilio, 1870- Leader of the Philippine insurgents in their insurrection against Spanish authority, in 1896, and organizer and president of the so-called Filipino Republic; was born in Imus, in the province of Cavite, in Luzon, in 1870. He is a Chinese mestizo (of Chinese and Tagalog parentage), and received his early education at the College of St. Jean de Lateran and the University of St. Tomas, in Manila. Later he became the protege of a Jesuit priest, and was for a time a st1870. He is a Chinese mestizo (of Chinese and Tagalog parentage), and received his early education at the College of St. Jean de Lateran and the University of St. Tomas, in Manila. Later he became the protege of a Jesuit priest, and was for a time a student in the medical department of the Pontifical University of Manila. In 1883 he went to Hong-Kong, became interested in military affairs, learned something of Emilio Aguinaldo. the English, French, and Chinese languages, and through his reputation for ability, shrewdness, and diplomacy, and his personal magnetism, gained great influence with his countrymen. In the rebellion of 1896 he was a commanding figure, and was at the head of the diplomatic party, which succeeded in making terms wit
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Aldrich, Charles, 1828- (search)
Aldrich, Charles, 1828- Historian; born in Ellington, N. Y., Oct. 2, 1828; was educated at Jamestown Academy, N. Y. On June 29, 1857, he established The Freedman, a newspaper in Webster City, In. For several years between 1860 and 1870 he was chief clerk of the Iowa House of Representatives, and in 1882 was a member of that body; in 1875 served with the United States Geological Survey in the Rocky Mountains; and in 1892 established the Historical Department of Iowa, of which he afterwards was made curator and secretary.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alexander, Edward Porter, 1835- (search)
Alexander, Edward Porter, 1835- Engineer; born in Washington, Ga., May 26, 1835; was graduated at the United States Military Academy, and commissioned a second lieutenant in the United States Engineer Corps in 1857, resigned and entered the Confederate army in 1861; served with the Army of Northern Virginia from the beginning to the close of the war, attaining the rank of brigadier-general and chief of ordnance. In 1866-70 he was Professor of Mathematies and Engineering in the University of South Carolina; in 1871-92 engaged in railroad business; and in 1892-94 was a member of the Boards on Navigation of the Columbia River, Ore., and on the ship-canal between Chesapeake and Delaware bays. Subsequently he was engineer-arbitrator of the boundary survey between Costa Rica and Nicaragua.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allen, Ethan, 1737- (search)
lature of Vermont, and as a delegate in Congress, he secured the great object of his efforts — namely, the ultimate recognition of Vermont as an independent State. He removed to Burlington before the close of the war, and died there Feb. 13, 1780. In 1894 the United States government established a new military post 5 miles from Burlington and named it after him. See Ethan Allen. Fort. lawyer; born in Monmouth county, N. J., May 12, 1832; was graduated at Brown University in 1860. At the beginning of the Civil War he raised a brigade of troops, but did not enter the service. In 1861-69 he was deputy United States attorney for the Southern District of New York; in 1870-90 practised law in New York City; and in the Presidential campaign of 1872 was chairman of the National Liberal Republican Committee. Subsequently he was president of the Cuban League of the United States. He is the author of Washington, or the Revolution, a history of the American Revolution in dramatic for
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allen, Joel Asaph, 1838- (search)
Allen, Joel Asaph, 1838- Zoologist; born in Springfield, Mass., July 19, 1838; studied zoology at the Lawrence Scientific School. In 1865-71 he was a member of scientific expeditions to Brazil, the Rocky Mountains, and Florida: in 1870-85 was assistant in ornithology at the Museum of Comparative Zoology in Cambridge. He was president of the American Ornithologists' Union in 1883-90, and since 1885, has been curator of the department of vertebrate zoology in the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Professor Allen edited the Bulletin of the Nuttall Ornithological Club, and was author of Monographs of North American Rodents (with Elliott Coues); History of North American Pinnipeds, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allibone, Samuel Austin, 1816- (search)
Allibone, Samuel Austin, 1816- Bibliographer: born in Philadelphia. April 17, 1816. He was the author of A critical Dictionary of English Literature and British and American authors, living and deceased, from the earliest accounts to the latter half of the nineteenth century. This work is in 3 volumes royal octavo. and exhibits evidence of great care, industry, good judgment, most extensive research, and immense labor in its preparation. Dr. Allibone spent many years in gathering and arranging his materials. The volumes were published in 1859, 1870, and 1871. The work contains notices of 47,000 authors, with forty classified indexes of subjects. Dr. Allibone contributed articles to the North American review, the Evangelical review, and other periodicals, and was the author of some religious controversial essays. He also privately printed and circulated a number of tracts. He was librarian of the Lenox Library in New York City at the time of his death, Sept. 2, 1889.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), America's cup, (search)
America's cup, The popular name of a yachting trophy originally called the Queen's Cup, which was offered by the Royal Yacht Squadron of England in a America's cup. competition open to the yachts of all nations in 1851. The cup was won by the Boston-built schooner-yacht America. Since then there were challenge contests in 1870, 1871, 1876, 1881, 1885, 1886, 1887, 1893, 1895, and 1899, and in each instance the cup was defended by American yachts, with success. In 1895 Lord Dunraven's yacht, Valkyrie, after having been defeated in one race, won the second, but was deprived of the victory because of a foul. The Englishman claimed that he had been cheated, and refused to race again. He charged the American yachtsmen with unsportsmanlike conduct, and visited this country to press his charges. His complaints were dismissed and he was dropped from the list of members of the New York Yacht Club, under whose auspices the races had been held. One of the most notable of the several
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