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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 304 304 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 99 99 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 50 50 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 48 48 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 41 41 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 25 25 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. 25 25 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 15 15 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 15 15 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for 1870 AD or search for 1870 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 11 document sections:

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
eighty-nine dollars and three cents were appropriated to reimburse citizens who had subscribed and paid money for raising volunteers. The selectmen in 1866 reported that Hinsdale had furnished eighty-five men for the war, and the town-clerk in 1870 reports that Hinsdale furnished but seventy-three men, when the fact is, that Hinsdale furnished at least one hundred and fifty men; for it furnished its full quota on every call of the President for men, and at the end of the war had a surplus ofpaid to those who have paid, or help to pay, commutation-money; and that said money be paid by the treasurer of the town to said persons, on the 1st of January, 1866. New Marlborough furnished, according to the returns made by the town-clerk in 1870, one hundred and fifty-nine men for the war, which, including the men who paid commutation, is about its exact proportion; but which does not include twenty-four men who enlisted in Connecticut regiments, and for which the town received no credit
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
Chapter 4: Bristol County. The county of Bristol is bounded north by Norfolk County, east by Plymouth, south-east by Buzzard's Bay, and west by the counties of Providence, Bristol, and Newport, Rhode Island. It is divided into nineteen municipalities, of which New Bedford, Fall River, and Taunton are cities. The entire population of the county in 1860 was 93,794, in 1865 it was 89,339; being a decrease in five years of 4,455. The population in 1870 was 102,886, being an increase in five years of 13,191. The total valuation of the county in 1860 was $66,294,526, in 1865 it was $87,428,503; being an increase in five years of $21,133,983. This county gives rise to several streams, which fall into Massachusetts and Narragansett Bays, the most important of which is Taunton Great River, that in times past was famous for its herring fisheries. New Bedford and Dartmouth are well known as being the chief seats of the whale-fishery. Fall River and Taunton are largely engaged in ma
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 5: Dukes County. (search)
ff and south of Barnstable County and Buzzard's Bay, and contain about one hundred and twenty square miles. They constitute five townships, as follows: Edgartown, Chilmark, Gay Head, Gosnold, and Tisbury. The town of Gay Head was incorporated in 1870, from a part of Chilmark; and therefore its war record is included in that of the mother-town. The shire town of the county is Edgartown. The population of Dukes County in 1860 was 4,403; in 1865, 4,200, being a decrease in five years of 203. The population in 1870 was 3,787, which is a further decrease in five years of 413. The valuation of the county in 1860 was $2,908,194; in 1865, $2,183,976, which is a decrease in five years of $724,218. By the returns made by the selectmen of the several towns in 1866, the number of men furnished in the entire county for the war was 240, which is only about half of the real number which the county furnished for the army and navy during the war. It filled its quota on every call made by the P
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
n at any previous time, has been outstripped by Gloucester as a fishing and commercial town, and is as much interested in the manufacture of shoes as in commerce and the fisheries. The number of municipalities in the county is thirty-four; of these Gloucester, Haverhill, Lawrence, Lynn, Newburyport, and Salem are large and flourishing cities. In 1860 the population of the county was 165,611, in 1865 it was 171,192, being an increase in five years of 5,581. The population of the county in 1870 was 200,843, which is an increase in five years of 29,651. The valuation of the county in 1860 was $84,637,837, in 1865 it was $90,393,467, being an increase in five years of $5,755,630. According to the returns made by the city and town authorities in 1866, with the exception of Salem and Saugus, which made no return, Essex County furnished 17,806 men for the war. Since that time Salem has made a return, in which it claims to have furnished 2,789. Saugus has made no return, but it prob
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
d sheep. The Connecticut River flows through its centre from north to south, and the Deerfield and Miller's Rivers pass through rich and beautiful valleys. It is a quiet, pastoral region, with here and there busy manufacturing towns. Greenfield is the shire town, and is widely known as one of the most beautiful of our New-England villages. The population of Franklin County in 1860 was 31,434, in 1865 it was 31,342, showing a decrease of 92 in the five years of the war. The population in 1870 was 32,635, which is an increase since 1865 of 1,292. The valuation of the county in 1860 was $12,448,961, in 1865 it was $13,048,120, which is an increase in five years of $599,259. The number of men which Franklin County furnished for the war, according to the returns made by the selectmen in 1866, was 3,159, which is about two hundred less than the actual number. Every town in the county furnished its full quota upon every call made by the President for men, and each had a surplus ove
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
e county are mountainous, but the principal part of it is rather undulating than hilly. The occupations of the people are farming and manufacturing, and altogether it is one of the most thriving and intelligent counties in the Commonwealth. The population of the county in 1860 was 57,866, in 1865 it was 64,438, which is an increase in five years of 6,572. The valuation of the county in 1860 was $28,252,663, in 1865 it was $33,253,177, which was an increase of $5,000,514 in five years. In 1870 the population of the county was 78,409, which was an increase in five years of 13,971. The county contains twenty-one towns and one city. The number of men furnished by the county for the war, as returned by the city and town authorities in 1866, was 6,239, which was about the true number that it furnished. The aggregate amount of money appropriated and expended by the various municipalities in Hampden on account of the war, exclusive of State aid to the families of soldiers, was $630,0
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
in of the Connecticut River; it has a rich soil and considerable water power, much of which is used for manufacturing purposes; it is also well provided with railroad accommodations. The county is divided into twenty-three towns, the largest and most important of which is Northampton, the county seat. The value of its agricultural and manufacturing products in 1865 was $13,143,957. The population in 1860 was 37,822; in 1865 it was 39,199, an increase in five years of 1377; the population in 1870 was 44,388, which is a gain of 5,189. The valuation of the county in 1860 was $17,737,649; in 1865 it was $20,510,994, an increase in five years of $2,773,345. The number of men furnished by the several towns in the county, according to the returns made by the selectmen in 1866, was three thousand seven hundred and ninety-three (3,793), which is very near the exact number. Each town furnished its full contingent upon every call made by the President for men, and at the end of the war had
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
t Charlestown. Lowell and Waltham are well known for their cotton manufactures, as are Marlborough, Woburn, Natick, and other towns for the manufacture of shoes. The aggregate value of the agricultural and manufacturing products of the county in 1870 was $83,102,442. The surface of the county is uneven, and the soil barren. It presents a great variety for the admiration of the patriot, scholar, farmer, mechanic, and painter. The population of Middlesex County in 1860 was 216,352; in 1865 it was 220,618, being an increase in five years of 4,266. The population in 1870 was 274,353, being an increase in five years of 53,735. The valuation of the county in 1860 was $135,458,009; in 1865 it was $155,324,723, being an increase in five years of $19,866,714. The number of men which Middlesex County furnished for the war, according to returns made by the selectmen of the towns and mayors of the cities in 1866—with the exception of Concord and West Cambridge, which do not appear to h
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
sland, and south and south-east by the counties of Bristol and Plymouth. It has a maritime coast on Boston Harbor of about twelve miles, which is indented by small bays and rivers. Its surface is uneven, and parts of it, especially near Boston, are highly cultivated. The population of the county in 1860 was 109,150; in 1865 it was 116,334; being an increase in five years of 7,184. Since 1865 the city of Roxbury and the town of Dorchester have been annexed to the city of Boston, so that in 1870 the population of Norfolk County was only 89,443. The valuation of the county in 1860 was $86,800,899; in 1865 it was $91,308,287; being an increase in five years of $4,507,388. The net value of the productions of the county for the year 1865 was $36,771,397. According to the returns made by the mayor of Roxbury and the selectmen of the towns in 1866, Norfolk County furnished thirteen thousand one hundred and four men for the war (13,104), which is very near the number that was actually c
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
the States of Rhode Island and Connecticut on the south; on the west it is bounded by the counties of Franklin, Hampshire, and Hampden; and on the east by Middlesex and Franklin. Worcester County contains fifty-seven towns, and one city,—Worcester. The soil is generally good; its surface is undulating and hilly; Wachusett Mountain is its highest elevation. The population of the county in 1860 was 159,650; in 1865 it was 162,923, being an increase in five years of 3,273. The population in 1870 was 192,718, being an increase since 1865 of 29,795. The valuation of the county in 1860 was $75,412,160; in 1865 it was $80,857,766, being an increase in five years of $5,445,606. According to the returns made by the selectmen of the towns and the mayor of Worcester in 1866, the whole number of men which the county furnished for the war was sixteen thousand six hundred and thirty-one (16,631), which is very near the exact number. Every city and town in the county furnished its contingen
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