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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 304 304 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 99 99 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 50 50 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 48 48 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 41 41 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 25 25 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. 25 25 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 16 16 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 15 15 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 15 15 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for 1870 AD or search for 1870 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
lenden Ker. H. Bellenden Ker was a conveyancer; was a friend of Lord Brougham, and passed the later years of his life at Cannes, in France, where he died, about 1870. Sumner was his guest at dinner on different occasions, at 27 Park Road, Regent's Park. And the dinner! it is to be spoken of always. There was a small company:ld like to do so very much if he could find a competent critic. He has read the work with the greatest pleasure. I dined last evening with Edward Romilly 1804-1870. (the son of Sir Samuel): there were only Lord Lansdowne, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Mr. Hallam, Mr. Wickham, Mrs. Marcet, and myself; and the conversation trederick Pollock, Talfourd, Alexander, Cresswell, Kelly, J. Jervis, Crowder, Erle, Bompas, Wightman, and perhaps some others. Pollock Frederick Pollock, 1783-1870. He became the leader of the Northern Circuit; was appointed Attorney-General in 1834; was superseded with a change of administration, and reappointed in 1841: be
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 16, 1839. (search)
an. We talked and drank tea, and looked at the beautiful pictures, the original editions of Milton and Spenser, and listened to the old man eloquent (I say eloquent indeed); and so the time passed. This morning I spent chatting with Hayward about law, literature, and society; then walked with Whewell, and afterwards dined with Bellenden Ker. H. Bellenden Ker was a conveyancer; was a friend of Lord Brougham, and passed the later years of his life at Cannes, in France, where he died, about 1870. Sumner was his guest at dinner on different occasions, at 27 Park Road, Regent's Park. And the dinner! it is to be spoken of always. There was a small company: our host and his wife,—one of the most beautiful women I have ever seen; Courtenay, Philip Courtenay; Queen's counsel, belonging to the Northern Circuit. Sumner dined with him at 23 Montague Street, Russell Square. M. P., and his beautiful daughter; Eastlake, the accomplished artist; and Lord Brougham. Then the house was a lit
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
ns prevailing, we heroically faced all the rest of the attack. The following are extracts The notes to the extracts are Mr. Sumner's. from the oration taken from the contemporaneous edition, by a comparison of which with the latest edition included in his Works his changes of style may be traced In the edition of Orations and Speeches published in November, 1850, the variations from the original editions of the oration are chiefly verbal; but in the edition of the Works published in 1870 there are, beside frequent changes in style, other changes softening expressions which gave offence at the time, and showing some modification of opinions.:— It is in obedience to an uninterrupted usage in our community that, on this Sabbath of the Nation, we have all put aside the common cares of life, and seized a respite from the never-ending toils of labor, to meet in gladness and congratulation, mindful of the blessings transmitted from the past, mindful also, I trust, of the dutie