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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 2 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for November 26th, 1870 AD or search for November 26th, 1870 AD in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
also, that he may not have been so guarded at all times in his language as could have been desirable, respecting the transfer of the Emancipator—a Ante, 2.342, 343, 351. transfer that was certainly very dishonorable, and wholly unworthy of the character of those who participated in it. Gerrit Smith says the transfer of the Emancipator was a great outrage—told Burleigh so—not publicly (Ms. Feb. 10, 1841, J. S. Gibbons to W. L. G.). The transfer of the Emancipator was indefensible (Ms. Nov. 26, 1870, Gerrit Smith to W. L. G.). Yet I doubt not that the mission of J. A. C. will do much for our persecuted Collins. enterprise. For what you have done to aid him, we all feel under the deepest obligations. May Heaven reward you a hundred-fold! Fear not that truth shall not triumph over falsehood, right over wrong, and freedom over slavery. No one can read the private advisory correspondence of Miss Pease with Collins without feeling admiration for her sagacity, sound judgment, pra<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
thorized to say that John P. Hale would submit to the action of the Convention; and when Van Buren led largely on the first ballot, Joshua Leavitt completed the suicide of the Liberty Party by moving that Van Buren's nomination be made unanimous. The Liberty Party began well and ended badly. . . . With the desertion of it by Mr. Leavitt, Mr. Stanton, Lewis Tappan, and others, I had no sympathy. Mr. Leavitt's prominent part in the nominating of Van Buren was very offensive to me (Ms. November 26, 1870, Gerrit Smith to W. L. G.). The Free Soil Party exists, wrote Quincy, Lib. 18.146. not because, but in spite of the Liberty Party. Van Buren had already come out against any further Lib. 18.102. enlargement of the slave area, affirming the power of Congress in the premises, and refusing to support either Lewis Cass or Zachary Taylor. He had at once received the nomination of the Barnburners' Convention at Utica, which was thus imposed upon the Buffalo Convention. His letter of