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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 253 253 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 76 76 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 53 53 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 39 39 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 38 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 28 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 22 22 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 18 18 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 16 16 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 15 15 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for 1872 AD or search for 1872 AD in all documents.

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en he fell, Colonel Vaughan was near his side and immediately took charge of his brigade, and by skill and courage richly earned the honor bestowed upon him by the President of the Confederacy. From the beginning of his career up to the battle of Chickamauga he had eight horses killed under him. At Vining Station, July 4, 1864, his leg was taken off by an exploding shell, and he was permanently disabled for military duty. After the war he returned to Mississippi and engaged in farming until 1872. The next year he opened a mercantile house in Memphis, Tenn. In 1878 the people of Shelby county elected him clerk of the criminal court by 6,000 majority. He has served officially as major-general, commanding the Tennessee division of United Confederate Veterans, in all the affairs of which he takes a lively interest. Brigadier-General John C. Vaughn Brigadier-General John C. Vaughn was born in Grayson county, Va., February 24, 1824. His family soon after moved to Tennessee and se