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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 253 253 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 76 76 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 53 53 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 39 39 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 38 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 28 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 22 22 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 18 18 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 16 16 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 15 15 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25.. You can also browse the collection for 1872 AD or search for 1872 AD in all documents.

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are indisputable evidence as to the appearance of Medford forty years ago; and these were in print four years before the publication of the Usher history, still his illustrations were mainly wood cuts. At that time the subject of a new town hall was being agitated and a little later that of the division of the town. Two weekly papers were being published in town, indeed there had been for ten years, for just a year after Usher's venture with the Journal, A. B. Morss began the Chronicle in 1872. After three years of existence the Journal vanished, leaving the field alone to the Chronicle. Neither of these papers ever used any illustrations which we can recall; they bear no evidence, as neither publisher preserved any file. Only a few stray copies show what the papers were and give visible evidence that such existed. In 1880 the Mercury began its long career, and two years later acquired the Chronicle's interest by purchase. During the agitation of the town hall proposition
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25., Old ships and ship-building days of Medford. (search)
interesting, containing but few errors, and those slight. Such corrections of them as are now made are from sources then not available. This book is especially noteworthy and creditable, as its various writers were all Medford people and (as we were told) all its mechanical features were executed by Medford men doing business in Boston. Also, in 1905, the Mercury issued a Twenty-fifth Anniversary number, dating from its establishment by Mr. Lawrence, and not from that of the Chronicle of 1872, whose interest and good will it had acquired by purchase. William Preble Jones succeeded Captain Pitman in the editorial sanctum, until the sale of the paper to Claude David in 1912. Mrs. David was his associate editor, but neither succeeded in revolutionizing Medford during their management. The city hall project was much in evidence, and the old one which had been the town hall of the grandfathers was continually maligned in the weekly issues. An automobile gift project, which did