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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 290 290 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 60 60 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 55 55 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 31 31 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 27 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 17 17 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 14 14 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 13 13 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 12 12 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22.. You can also browse the collection for 1873 AD or search for 1873 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

leted it to date, a total enumeration of 513. Thirty years later Mr. Usher alluded to the same and said it is too extensive for admission here, but gave an abstract of the same, which shows the number built in each of the seven decades, 1803 to 1873, and totals 567, 483 in the first five, and 84 in the last two, decades. Thirty of these last were named in detail by Mr. Brooks. All Mr. Usher said relative to the other is, The last ship built in this town was launched from the ship yard of Mr. Joshua T. Foster in 1873. He did not even give the name. Thus it appears (except in the above) there were 54 ships built in Medford, of which there is no record of name, owner, builder, style or tonnage, and that, too, in a history paid for liberally by the town, as well as by the purchasers. Referring to this register we find the first in enumeration of 1848, and 399th in order- Ship, Living Age; ship yard, J. Stetson's; builder, J. Stetson; owner, E. D. Peters & Co., Boston; tonn
estown. The colony and province days had been a quarter century gone ere the Mistick was bridged again, this time by a more massive structure, strong enough to carry, not a highway, but a waterway, with its superincumbent weight, the aqueduct of the Middlesex canal. This in 1802. Thirty-two years more and the canal was to have a rival, and Lowell railroad bridge was built nearby, the Winthrop bridge in 1855, and the Usher bridge in 1857. In 1863 the Charlestown Water-works bridge, and in 1873 the Canal bridge on the old aqueduct piers, connected West Medford with Somerville territory, and another at Auburn street the same year. Meanwhile the Middlesex-avenue bridge, with a draw, had been erected, and in earlier years (down stream, and not in Medford bounds) Chelsea bridge and those of the Eastern, and Boston and Maine railroads. In recent years the Canal, Armory, Auburn street-Parkway, and Metropolitan pipe bridge, and just now the Boston Elevated to Everett, complete the list o
e right, looking down stream. The lines of the river bank are here much changed, but the stone arch remains, embedded in the newer one of concrete, built in 1906. The upper right-hand view is Canal bridge, over which Boston avenue was built in 1873. There were four spans, in all one hundred and thirty-four feet, the length of the first canal aqueduct, which was here built in 1802. Renewed in 1827, on the old abutments and on three new granite piers, it remained disused from 1852 to 1873, g1873, gradually becoming a picturesque ruin, until utilized as here seen. The name was given it by the city government, at the request of the Historical Society, in 1903. The iron cover in the foreground is of the Metropolitan sewer siphon, and the daisies were in full bloom when the photographer looked up stream here. The earliest portion of the parkway to be built in Medford was from High street along the lakes to Winchester. Facing page 60 is a view of the same through the Brooks estate, anoth