hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 6 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for February 8th, 1873 AD or search for February 8th, 1873 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
e very small. In stragglers and prisoners, I fear it is much larger. The Chief of Artillery reports the loss of forty pieces. I am, Sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Braxton Bragg, General Commanding. Note.—As a matter of justice to General Anderson's Division, charged in the above report as breaking at Missionary Ridge, we append the following extract from an autograph letter of General Bragg to Major E. T. Sykes, of Columbus, Mississippi, dated Mobile, 8th of February, 1873: * * * * I have always believed our disaster at Missionary Ridge was due immediately to the misconduct of a brigade of Buckner's troops from East Tennessee, commanded by Brigadier-General Alex. W. Reynolds, which first gave way, and could not be rallied. Sketches of the history of the Washington Artillery. By Colonel J. B. Walton, Captain J. A. Chalaron, Colonel B. F. Eschelman, and Colonel W. M. Owen. [At the reunion of the famous old Washington Artillery in New Orleans, on t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. (search)
andsomely checked by Major-General Cleburne and Brigadier-General Gist, in command of their respective divisions, that he gave us but little annoyance. Our losses are not yet ascertained, but in killed and wounded it is known to be very small. In stragglers and prisoners, I fear it is much larger. The Chief of Artillery reports the loss of forty pieces. I am, Sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Braxton Bragg, General Commanding. Note.—As a matter of justice to General Anderson's Division, charged in the above report as breaking at Missionary Ridge, we append the following extract from an autograph letter of General Bragg to Major E. T. Sykes, of Columbus, Mississippi, dated Mobile, 8th of February, 1873: * * * * I have always believed our disaster at Missionary Ridge was due immediately to the misconduct of a brigade of Buckner's troops from East Tennessee, commanded by Brigadier-General Alex. W. Reynolds, which first gave way, and could not be rallied
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 78 (search)
mas's corps, One division of one brigade of Thomas's corps, about 8,000 men. (General Bragg's letter to me dated February 8th, 1873.) while in the act of passing one of the gaps leading from McLemore's Cove, enclosed between Lookout and Pigeon Mouong past the day's sunrise, It was 10 o'clock A. M. before General Polk made the attack. (General Bragg's letter, February 8, 1873.) for which falterings General Polk was a few days thereafter removed from the command of his corps. See the chasending General Longstreet into East Tennessee, instead of General Breckinridge, see General Bragg's letter to me of February 8, 1873. Governor Benjamin G. Humphries, at that time commanding a brigade (Barksdale's) in General Longstreet's corps, oncegypt) brigade of East Tennesseeans were the first to give way, and could not be rallied. (General Bragg's letter of February 8th, 1873.) At the time this brigade broke, Hardee was far down the plains in advance of his works, rapidly driving Sherman.