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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hickcox, John Howard 1832- (search)
Hickcox, John Howard 1832- Librarian; born in Albany, N. Y., Aug. 10, 1832; received an academic education; worked in the Congressional Library at Washington, D. C., in 1874-82. His publications include An Historical account of American coinage; History of the bills of credit, or paper money, issued by New York from 1709 to 1789; Bibliography of the writings of Dr. Franklin B. Hough; and Catalogue of United States government publications.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hill, David Jayne 1850- (search)
Hill, David Jayne 1850- Author; born in Plainfield, N. J., June 10, 1850; graduated at Bucknell University in 1874; was president of that institution in 1879-88, and of the University of Rochester in 1888-96, and became first assistant Secretary of State Oct. 1, 1898. His publications include Life of Washington Irving; Life of William Cullen Bryant; Principles and fallacies of socialism; International justice, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hobart, Garret Augustus 1844- (search)
Hobart, Garret Augustus 1844- Lawyer; born in Long Branch, N. J., June 3, 1844; was graduated at Rutgers College in 1863; admitted to the bar in 1866; and began practice in Paterson, N. J. In 1872 he was elected to the State Assembly; in 1873 was re-elected and chosen speaker; and in 1874 declined a renomination to the Assembly and was elected to the Senate, to which he was re-elected in 1879. In 1881 and 1882 he was president of the Senate. In 1896 he was elected Vice-President of the United States on the ticket with Mr. McKinley, and served till his death, in Paterson, N. J., Nov. 2, 1899. He was connected with a large Garret Augustus Hobart. number of financial concerns; was a man of exceptional personal magnetism, and ably supported President McKinley in the trying days of 1898.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hosmer, James Kendall 1834- (search)
, Mass., Jan. 29, 1834; graduated at Harvard College in 1855; served in the Civil War in the 52d Massachusetts Volunteers; was professor in Antioch College in 1866-72; Professor of English and German Literature in the University of Missouri in 1872-74; held the same chair in Washington University, St. Louis, Mo., in 1874-92; and became librarian of the Minneapolis Public Library in 1892. His publications include The color Guard, and the Life of Samuel Adams (in the American statesmen series). , Mass., Jan. 29, 1834; graduated at Harvard College in 1855; served in the Civil War in the 52d Massachusetts Volunteers; was professor in Antioch College in 1866-72; Professor of English and German Literature in the University of Missouri in 1872-74; held the same chair in Washington University, St. Louis, Mo., in 1874-92; and became librarian of the Minneapolis Public Library in 1892. His publications include The color Guard, and the Life of Samuel Adams (in the American statesmen series).
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hunter, Robert Mercer Taliaferro 1809- (search)
member of the House of Delegates when twenty-four years of age; and was a member of Congress from 1837 to 1841, and from 1845 to 1847. From 1839 to 1841 he was speaker. He was one of the most persistent supporters of the doctrine of State supremacy and of the slave-labor system, advocating with vehemence all measures calculated to enforce the practical operations of the former and to nationalize the latter. In 1847 he became a United States Senator, and remained such by re-election until July, 1861, when he was expelled from that body for treason against the government. He became the Confederate secretary of state, and afterwards a member of the Confederate Congress. After the war he was held for a while as a prisoner of state, but was released and pardoned by President Johnson in 1867. He was an unsuccessful candidate for United States Senator in 1874; became State treasurer of Virginia in 1877; and shortly before his death, July 18, 1887, became collector at Tappahannock, Va.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Income-tax. (search)
x was renewed for one year only by act of July 14, 1870, at the reduce rate of 2 1/2 per cent. on the excess of income above $2,000. A bill to repeal it passed the Senate Jan. 26, 1871, by 26 to 25. The House refused to take up the Senate bill Feb. 9, 1871, by a vote of 104 to 105, but on March 3, 1871, concurred in the report of a committee which endorsed the Senate bill and repealed the tax. The last tax levied under the law was in 1871. Income-taxes assessed and due in 1871 and for preceding years, however, continued to be collected, 1872-74, as seen by the subjoined table: Amount of revenue from income-tax each year. 1863$2,741,857 186420,294,733 186532,050,017 186672,982,160 186766,014,429 186841,455,599 186934,791,857 187037,775,872 187119,162,652 187214,436,861 18735,062,312 1874140,391 ————— Total$346908740 The Wilson tariff bill of 1894 contained provisions for an income-tax, which the United States Supreme Court declared unconstitutional on May
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Inflation legislation. (search)
ecretary Richardson reissued $25,000,000 of it to relieve the embarrassed banks. A bill fixing the legal-tender United States currency at $400,000,000, and making some important stipulations about bank issues, was passed by both Houses early in 1874, but was vetoed by the President. A part of the veto message is here given to show the grounds of his action: Practically it is a question whether the measure under discussion would give an additional dollar to the irredeemable paper currenored, or are in rapid process of restoration, will be the time to consider the question of more currency. An act fixing the issue of United States notes at $383,000,000, the amount then outstanding, was approved June 20, 1874. Between 1868 and 1874 the amount of fractional notes had also been increased from $25,000,000 to $46,000,000. In January, 1875, the resumption act was passed, and under its provisions the retirement of United States notes was again begun. The redemption of the fract
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Inman, William 1797-1874 (search)
Inman, William 1797-1874 Naval officer; born in Utica, N. Y., in 1797; appointed midshipman, United States navy, in 1812; promoted to lieutenant, April 1, 1818; commander in 1838: and captain in 1850. In 1859-61 he commanded the West African squadron, during which time he succeeded in recapturing and liberating nearly 4,000 slaves; and was promoted commodore, and was retired, April 4, 1867. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 23, 1874.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Inundations. (search)
were torn from the ground and washed down the mountain sides. 1849, May 12. A flood in New Orleans spread over 160 squares and submerged 1,600 buildings. 1874, May 16. The bursting of a reservoir on Mill River, near Northampton, Mass., caused the destruction of several villages in the valley and the loss of 144 lives. 1874, July 24. A waterspout burst in Eureka, Nev., and with the attendant heavy rains caused a loss of between twenty and thirty lives. 1874, July 26. An unusual fall of rain caused the overflow of the rivers in western Pennsylvania and the loss of 220 lives. 1881, June 12. Disastrous floods began in Iowa, Kans1874, July 26. An unusual fall of rain caused the overflow of the rivers in western Pennsylvania and the loss of 220 lives. 1881, June 12. Disastrous floods began in Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, and Missouri, lasting several days, and causing the destruction of much property. 1882, Feb. 22. The valleys of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers were flooded, and the loss of life and property was so great that the governor of Mississippi made a public appeal for help. 1883, February. Portions of Pennsylv
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), James, Henry Ammon 1854- (search)
James, Henry Ammon 1854- Lawyer; born in Baltimore, Md., April 24, 1854; graduated at Yale College in 1874, and at its law school in 1878; began practice in New York City in 1880. He is the author of Communism in America.
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