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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Eads, James Buchanan, 1820- (search)
oned that if the banks of the passage through the bar could be extended, not gradually, but immediately, into the deep water of the Port Eads South pass of the Mississippi River. Gulf some 2 miles or more, it would produce force enough to excavate a channel the whole length of the bar. This project he undertook to carry out at his own expense, agreeing not to receive compensation for the work until it was completed; and the truth of his reasoning was proved by the results. In the winter of 1874-75 he laid his plan before Congress, and in March, 1875, a bill was passed empowering him to put it into execution. The work was begun in June, 1875. The jetties were lad out parallel with the current of the river, and at right angles with the Gulf current, extending with a slight curve 2 1/4 miles out from the mouth of the river. Piles were first driven in to mark the path of the jetties; then willows fastened together in enormous mattresses were sunk, and these filled in with stones and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Edmonds, John worth, 1799-1874 (search)
Edmonds, John worth, 1799-1874 Lawyer; born in Hudson, N. Y., March 13, 1799; graduated at Union College in 1816; admitted to the bar in 1819; elected to the New York Assembly in 1831, and the New York Senate in 1832; became a circuit judge in 1845, and was appointed to the Court of Appeals in 1852. He was the author of Spiritualism; Letters and tracts on spiritualism, besides a number of law books. He died in New York City, April 5, 1874.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Farrar, Timothy 1788-1874 (search)
Farrar, Timothy 1788-1874 Jurist; born in New Ipswich, N. H., March 17, 1788; was associated in law practice with Daniel Webster in 1813-16; vice-president of the New England Historico-Genealogical Society in 1853-58. His publications include Report of the Dartmouth College case; Review of the Dred Scott decision; and Manual of the Constitution of the United States. He died in 1874. Farrar, Timothy 1788-1874 Jurist; born in New Ipswich, N. H., March 17, 1788; was associated in law practice with Daniel Webster in 1813-16; vice-president of the New England Historico-Genealogical Society in 1853-58. His publications include Report of the Dartmouth College case; Review of the Dred Scott decision; and Manual of the Constitution of the United States. He died in 1874.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Florida, (search)
rew Jackson1821 to 1822 William P. Duval1822 to 1834 John H. Eaton1834 to 1836 Richard K. Call1836 to 1839 Robert R. Reid1839 to 1841 Richard K. Call1841 to 1844 John Branch1844 to 1845 State governors. NameTerm. William D. Moseley1845 to 1849 Thomas Brown1849 to 1853 James E. Broome1853 to 1857 Madison S. Perry1857 to 1861 John Milton1861 to 1865 William Marvin1865 to 1866 David S. Walker1866 to 1868 Harrison Reed1868 to 1872 Ossian B. Hart1872 to 1874 Marcellus L. Stearns1874 to 1877 George F. Drew1877 to 1881 William D. Bloxham1881 to 1885 Edward A. Perry1885 to 1889 Francis P. Fleming1889 to 1893 Henry L. Mitchell1893 to 1897 William D. Bloxham1897 to 1901 William S. Jennings1901 to — United States Senators. NameNo. of CongressDate. James D. Westcott, Jr29th to 30th1845 to 1849 David L. Yulee29th to 31st1845 to 1851 Jackson Morton31st to 33d1849 to 1855 Stephen R. Mallory32d to 36th1851 to 1861 David L. Yulee34th to 36th1855 to 1861 [37th, 38th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Foresters, independent order of (search)
Foresters, independent order of A fraternal organization founded in 1874; high courts, 43; subordinate courts, 4,000; members, 170,000; benefits disbursed since organization, $8,853,190; benefits disbursed last fiscal year, $1,430,200.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Foster, John Gray 1823-1874 (search)
Foster, John Gray 1823-1874 Military officer; born in Whitefield, N. H., May 27, 1823; graduated at West Point in 1846, entering the engineer corps. He served in the war with Mexico and was brevetted captain for meritorious services. For two years (1855-57) he was Professor of Engineering at West Point; promoted to captain in July, 1860; major in March, 1863; and lieutenant-colonel in 1867. He was one of the garrison of Fort Sumter during the siege, and was made brigadiergeneral of volunteers in October, 1861. He took a leading part in the capture of Roanoke Island, early in 1862, and of Newbern, N. C.; was promoted to majorgeneral of volunteers, and became commander of the Department of North Carolina, and defended that region with skill. In July, 1863, he was made commander of the Department of Virginia and North Carolina, with his headquarters at Fort Monroe. He was afterwards in command of the Department of Ohio, of which he was relieved on account of wounds in January
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gerard, James Watson 1794-1874 (search)
Gerard, James Watson 1794-1874 Lawyer; born in New York City in 1794; graduated at Columbia in 1811; practised law in New York till 1869; secured the incorporation of the House of Refuge for Juvenile Delinquents in New York, which was the first institution of this kind in the United States. He was also an ardent advocate for a uniformed police. He died in New York, Feb. 7, 1874.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gillmore, Quincy Adams 1825-1888 (search)
nd planned and executed measures for the capture of Fort Pulaski in the spring of 1862, when he was made brigadier-general of volunteers. After service in western Virginia and Kentucky, he was brevet- Quincy Adams Gillmore. ted colonel in the United States army, and succeeded Hunter (June, 1863) in command of the Department of South Carolina, when he was promoted to majorgeneral. After a long and unsuccessful attempt to capture Charleston in 1862, he was assigned to the command of the 10th Army Corps, and in the autumn of 1863, resumed operations in Charleston Harbor, which resulted in his occupation of Morris Island, the reduction of Fort Sumter, and the reduction and capture of Fort Wagner and Battery Gregg. General Gillmore was the author of many works on engineering and a notable one on The strength of the building stones of the United States (1874). For these services during the war he was brevetted majorgeneral in the regular army. He died in Brooklyn, N. Y., April 7, 1888.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Grand army of the republic, the. (search)
y of the Republic held thus far, with the names of the commanders-in-chief elected: 1. Indianapolis, Ind., 1866; S. A. Hurlbut, Illinois. 2. Philadelphia, Pa., 1868; John A. Logan, Illinois. 3. Cincinnati, O., 1869; John A. Logan, Illinois. 4. Washington, 1870; John A. Logan, Illinois. 5. Boston, Mass., 1871; A. E. Burnside, Rhode Island. 6. Cleveland, O., 1872; A. E. Burnside, Rhode Island. 7. New Haven, Conn., 1873; Charles Devens, Jr., Massachusetts. 8. Harrisburg, Pa., 1874; Charles Devens, Jr., Massachusetts. 9. Chicago, III., 1875; John F. Hartranft, Pennsylvania. 10. Philadelphia, Pa., 1876; John F. Hartranft, Pennsylvania. 11. Providence, R. I., 1877; John C. Robinson, New York. 12. Springfield, Mass., 1878; John C. Robinson, New York. 13. Albany, N. Y., 1879; William Earnshaw, Ohio. 14. Dayton, O., 1880; Louis Wagner, Pennsylvania. 15. Indianapolis, Ind., 1881; George S. Merrill, Massachusetts. 16. Baltimore, Md., 1882; Paul Van Der
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gray, Elisha 1835- (search)
arnesville, O., Aug. 2, 1835; in early life was a blacksmith, carpenter, and boatbuilder. Later he went to Oberlin College, where he followed special studies in physical science, supporting himself by working at his trade. In 1867 he invented a self-adjusting telegraph relay, and soon afterwards designed the telegraphic switch and annunciator for hotels, the private telegraph line printer, the telegraphic repeater, etc. In 1872 he organized the Western Electric Manufacturing Company, but in 1874 withdrew from it. In 1876 he claimed to have invented the speaking telephone, but after a memorable litigation that honor was awarded by the courts to Prof. Alexander Graham Bell. In 1893 Professor Gray invented the telautograph, which so far improved the telephone and the telegraph as to transmit the actual handwriting of messages. He established the Gray Electric Company at Highland Park, Ill., and organized the Congress of Electricians, in connection with the World's Columbian Expositio
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