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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 2 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 1 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 1 1 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for August, 1874 AD or search for August, 1874 AD in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
topic of conversation. There was talk of violence in barrooms and similar resorts in Washington, but the only overt act was the intrusion of a Southern man four days after into Sumner's lodgings, who was offensive in speech and manner, and signified his purpose to come again. Sumner's friends,— among them Wilson, Burlingame, Sherman, and A. B. Johnson, --took precautions, though not at Sumner's instance, and even against his protest. Works, vol. v. pp. 127-129; Scribner's Magazine, August, 1874, pp. 483-486; Recollections of Charles Sumner, by A. B. Johnson; New York Evening Post. June 11; New York Herald, June 11; New York Tribune, June 11. The Tribune's correspondent, June 5, thought that only prudence restrained the Southern party, as the speech was more severe than the one made in 1856. He notified Wilson of what had occurred, but he called upon no one to defend him, and took no part in the arrangements made by others for his protection. He particularly chafed at the guard