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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 225 225 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 54 54 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 29 29 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 28 28 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 25 25 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 11 11 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 9 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 9 9 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1875 AD or search for 1875 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
ste places. Then came what was worse than defeat, impartial suffrage, which meant disfranchisement of whites and enfranchisement of blacks, then the terrors of reconstruction and negro rule broke over us like the roar of some terrible simoon, bearing in its path further humiliation, accompanied by a corrupt government, increased taxes, and a depreciation of values. Such was the struggle through which the best men of North Carolina were called to pass in those fateful years between 1860 and 1875. These were the years on which the fate of the future in a large measure depended. Well did the brave men of that generation come to the succor of the foundering ship of State, and nobly did they rescue her from the rule of her motley crew. The best men of North Carolina were engaged in this work, and among them, most frequently as leaders, were many alumni of the University of North Carolina. Ii. University men in public life. Before beginning to trace the career of the alumni of t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
n with General Ewell by an early attack by our right, of which he wrote in his letter of May 31, 1875. In other words, had he placed his troops at General Lee's disposal at the proper time, it was unquestionably the purpose of the latter to have ordered an attack at sunrise or soon thereafter. His troops not being in position, of course the attack could not be made. The two statements made by General Longstreet as to the time that he reported with his divisions, cannot be reconciled. In 1875 when he wrote the letter from which I have quoted, he claims that neither he, nor his divisions reached General Lee until 8 o'clock A. M. In his book, published twenty years later, he claims that he reported at General Lee's headquarters before day, the stars were shining brightly, and that his two divisions reached the front at sunrise, say at 4:35 A. M. The preponderance of contemporaneous evidences goes to prove that General Longstreet accurately described the facts in his letter of April,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Goochland Light Dragoons. (search)
Thomas C. Cosby, F. N. Fleming, died 1887, C. D. Fleming, W. L. Fleming, Thomas Mann Fleming, died 1872, Reubin Ford, Thomas C. Gait, died 1896, Robert Galt, died 1875, David L. Hall, William R. Hall, wounded at Williamsburg, Va., Thomas M. Harris, died of wounds received at Buckland, Silas M. Hart, died about 1885, John C. Jamesdleton, Charles K. Pendleton, Richard Pemberton, died 1863, Thomas Pemberton, died 1870, Thomas J. Perkins, died 1872, C. H. Powell, trumpeter, Jim Pleasants, died 1875 from wound received at Front Royal, Thomas J. Rutherford, died 1883, S. D. Ragland, William R. Rock, John S. Swift, died 1874, Oscar Shultice, died 1892, R. A. Trice, John M. Toler, died 1875, A. V. Taylor, Peter D. Woodson and James E. Walder. This makes a total of fifty-seven, rank and file. The following recruits enlisted from time to time: David B. Allan, dead, Powhatan Ayers, dead, E. H. Argyle, Joseph Argyle, dead, Mat. G. Anderson, dead, Robert Anderson, Pat. Brannan, drowned 186