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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 266 266 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 77 77 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 52 52 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 39 39 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 22 22 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 15 15 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 14 14 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 10 10 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 10 10 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1876 AD or search for 1876 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Virginia, or Merrimac: her real projector. (search)
which it is surmounted. Her immense bulk, unprecedented armament, powerful machinery and the provision for ramming and for resisting the impact of rams as well as of shot and shell, have made it necessary that strength and solidity should enter into every part of the structure. The Inflexible having been accepted as one of the types of the British future line — of battle ships, two others have been put in process of construction—the Ajax, which was laid down at the Pembroke dock-yard in 1876; and the Agamemnon, commenced at the Chatham in the same year, and launched in 1879. After so full an account of the Inflexible, any detailed description of these two sister ships would be a mere repetition. The Colossus and the Majestic * * *two steel sister ships, are of the same type as the vessels just described, and of dimensions between the Inflexible and the Ajax. In Constructor Porter's reply to Justice, he says: Of the great and skillful calculations of the displacemen
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.59 (search)
n the Dispatch of Sunday, March 15th, there is a clipping from the Atlanta Constitution, giving an account of a stormy scene which occurred in the Confederate States Senate between Ben. Hill and William L. Yancey, and the writer says so far as I know neither one ever saw in print any reference to the episode which came so near ending in the immediate death of Yancey. Now, I have in a scrap-book a clipping from the Columbia (Tenn.) Herald, date not given, but which was published about 1874 or 1876, which says: Among the many events of personal interest that occurred in the South during the late war but few are of more dramatic character or aroused a deeper interest among our people than the unfortunate personal difficulty which took place in the Confederate States Senate at Richmond, during its secret session, between Mr. William L. Yancey, of Alabama, and Mr. Ben. H. Hill, of Georgia. Several different and conflicting versions of this affair have been given through the southern