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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 266 266 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 77 77 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 52 52 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 39 39 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 22 22 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 15 15 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 14 14 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 10 10 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 10 10 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907. You can also browse the collection for 1876 AD or search for 1876 AD in all documents.

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at all this means, the thought of human achievement stimulates us to try to keep up to the high standard set by our predecessors, especially those who rocked the cradle of Liberty in the troublous times preceding the Revolution. On the first complete map of Boston, drafted by Captain John Bonner in 1722, is a record of three trees only, standing at the time the first settlers came. One of these, represented as the largest, was the Old Elm on Boston Common, blown down in the great storm of 1876. The two others were near the middle of what is now Park street, both long since victims of the march of time. A chair made of the wood of the Old Elm is now in the Boston Public Library. One of its descendants was planted on the hill where the Soldiers' Monument stands in 1889, but it is not marked. Shawmut, as the new settlement was first named, thus presented a striking contrast to Charlestown, which is said to have been covered with timber at that time. Fuel was obtained from Deer
set out seventy years ago. Only one remains to-day, standing by the sidewalk. A Revolutionary elm stood at the corner of Broadway and Cross street until 1860, when it was cut down. Two tulip trees are remembered growing on the Runey estate on Cross street. As tulip trees are slow in coming to their maturity, they must have been of great age. Willows are remembered growing on Broadway, about opposite Walnut street, long before the land was made into a park. The present trees date front 1876, when, on the seventeenth of June, the park was dedicated and formally opened to the public. Many citizens, at the invitation of the city government, presented trees, which were set out and marked with the names of the donors. Only a very few of the names can be ascertained, as there was no official record kept, or if it was kept, it has been lost. Ex-Mayor Furber set out four for himself and family; ex-Mayor Brastow, Zadoc Bowman, N. E. Fitz, Aaron Sargent, and John C. Magoun each set out