hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 233 233 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 48 48 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 38 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 21 21 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 18 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 15 15 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 8 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1877 AD or search for 1877 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
ary 28th, 1863—January 27th, 1864. Accounts of the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Jeffersonton, Bristow Station, Locust Grove, Mine Run, the March into Maryland and Pennsylvania, with reminiscences of the Battle of Seven Pines. [The Editor has pleasure in preserving in these pages the following graphic record. Captain Park has proven himself in maturer years, as progressive, public spirited, and successful as a citizen as he was gallant and faithful as a soldier.] In 1876-7, the latter part of my War and Prison Diary was published in serial in the Southern Historical Society Papers, the earlier portion having been lost by me on the battle field. In 1888, eleven years later, a letter signed Mrs. Vine Smith, Lebanon, New Hampshire, was forwarded me from Greenville, Ga., by my brother, which conveyed the joyful news that the remaining portion of my Diary was in her possession, and that she was willing to return it. I lost no time in securing it, and offer it for wh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Memorial. (search)
lected to the moderator's chair in the assembly, which met in St. Louis. In 1876, when the assembly convened in Savannah, Ga., he advocated and carried by overwhelming majorities two measurers, greatly opposed at that time by some of the most distinguished members. These were the establishment of fraternal relations—not organic union—with the Northern Presbyterian Church, and the sending of commissioners to represent the Southern Church in alliance of the reformed churches of the world. In 1877 he was a delegate to the Pan-Presbyterian Council, which met in Edinburgh. His paternal ancestor fleeing from persecution for his religious faith, was of that worthy strain which has entered so influentially into the elements of Virginian character, which has made it so distinctive—the Huguenot—as referred to in the following statement: A very graphic letter was written by Moncure D. Conway, and extensively published in this country, describing Dr. Hoge's appearance and the effect of