Your search returned 11 results in 10 document sections:

The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
difficult to pass beyond them without noting the manner in which, by their ignorance, they marred the plans of their chief on the field of battle. Mr. Pendleton robbed Pickett's Division of its most important adjunct, fresh field artillery, at the moment of its severest trial, and thus frustrated the wise and brilliant programme of assault planned by General Alexander, and without the knowledge of that officer. (See narrative of General Alexander in the Southern historical Monthly for September, 1877.) General Early broke up General Lee's line of battle on the 2d of July by detaching part of his division on some uncalled — for service, in violation of General Lee's orders, and thus prevented the co-operative attack of Ewell, ordered by General Lee. It is proper to discuss briefly, at this point, the movements of the third day. The charge of that day, as made by General Pickett, was emphatically a forlorn hope. The point designated by General Lee as the point of attack, seemed t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
difficult to pass beyond them without noting the manner in which, by their ignorance, they marred the plans of their chief on the field of battle. Mr. Pendleton robbed Pickett's division of its most important adjunct, fresh field artillery, at the moment of its severest trial, and thus frustrated the wise and brilliant programme of assault planned by General Alexander, and without the knowledge of that officer. (See narrative of General Alexander in the Southern Historical Papers for September, 1877.] General Early broke up General Lee's line of battle on the 2d of July by detaching part of his division on some uncalled — for service, in violation of General Lee's orders, and thus prevented the co-operative attack of Ewell ordered by General Lee. It is proper to discuss briefly, at this point, the movements of the third day. The charge of that day as made by General Pickett was emphatically a forlorn hope. The point designated by General Lee as the point of attack seemed to be
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The true story of the capture of Jefferson Davis. (search)
n said as to events occurring at the time of the evacuation of Richmond. Still later, but entirely independent of all other evidence, has appeared the letter of the Hon. John H. Reagan, Confederate Postmaster-General, published in the Philadelphia Times, entirely corroborating the statements hereunto appended, and giving emphasis (if that were possible) to their exposure of the untruthfulness of General Wilson's narrative in its beginning, its middle, and its end. W. T. Walthall. September, 1877. Letter from Colonel William Preston Johnston, late aid to President Davis. Lexington, Va., July 14th, 1877. Major W. T. Walthall, Mobile, Ala.: My dear sir: Your letter has just come to hand, and I reply at once. Wilson's monograph is written with a very strong animus, not to say virus. It is in no sense historical. It bears upon its face all the marks of special pleading. He states, as matters of fact, numberless circumstances which could not be of his own knowledge, an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A review of the First two days operations at Gettysburg and a reply to General Longstreet by General Fitz. Lee. (search)
y,) that it was General Lee's intention to attack the enemy on the 2nd of July as early as practicable, and it is my opinion that he issued orders to that effect. In letters published in the Southern Historical Society Papers for August and September, 1877, General Long gives various details which demonstrate that General Lee expected Longstreet to attack early in the morning of the 2nd; that, at 10 o'clock, General Lee's impatience became so urgent that he proceeded in person to hasten the moest of Longstreet. Col. Walter H. Taylor, of General Lee's staff, whose letter General Longstreet gives to show that he did not hear the order for an early attack, says, in his article published in the Southern Historical Society Papers for September, 1877, it is generally conceded that General Longstreet on this occasion was fairly chargeable with tardiness; that he had been urged the day before by General Lee to hasten his march; and, that, on the morning of the 2nd, General Lee was chafed b
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Lee's right wing at Gettysburg. (search)
this subject have taken up and followed the false scent announced by General Pendleton. Outside that State, I believe Mr. Davis and General Wilcox are the only persons who do not spurn it as false. Facts connected with this battle have been so distorted and misrepresented that a volume of distinct maps must be written in order to make a demonstration, to the letter, of all its features. General C. M. Wilcox, in an article in the number of the Southern Historical Society papers for September, 1877, refers to the order for early attack, viz.: It has been asserted that General Longstreet was ordered to attack at daylight or early the next morning. Of this I have no knowledge personally, but am inclined to believe that he was so ordered. But from the official accounts of Generals Pendleton and Wilcox Official Records, Vol. XXVII., Part II., pp. 346, 616. we see that the right of General Lee's army was not deployed as far as the Fairfield road on the 1st of July, that G
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General C. M. Wilcox on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
he enemy's left about 4 P. M. This division was not opposite the left of the enemy, as has been stated, but was in woods that had been already occupied by the Confederates since between 8 and 9 A. M., and opposite the right of Sickles' corps. If we follow Longstreet's corps in its march to get into position as directed, we will see most unusual and extraordinary delay. Colonel Alexander, who commanded two battalions of artillery, informs us that he was ordered between 8 and 9 A. M. September, 1877, number of Southern Historical Papers. to reconnoitre the ground and co-operate with the infantry attack to be made on the enemy's left flank. He got his order from General Longstreet, whilst he and General Lee were together on a hill in rear of our lines. General Longstreet, as has been stated, received this order, according to his first article in the Times, at 11 A. M. Colonel Alexander, after examining the country, conducted his own and then went about hunting up other battalions
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, chapter 19 (search)
ealed by Mr. Davis? If it were true that Mr. Fish ever made the communication to senators which Mr. Davis now alleges, such communication would also have been made first of all to the President, before even it was mentioned to a senator. But General Grant, in all his justifications of Mr. Sumner's removal, puts forth two only,—the pigeon-holing and the non-speaking ones, as in his conversation with Mr. Curtis in the summer of 1871 at Long Branch, and in his interviews in Scotland in September, 1877, and at Cairo in January, 1878, without ever making the remotest allusion to the reason which Mr. Davis now resorts to when the others have failed. Again, and finally, as showing that no views of Mr. Sumner about Canada ever prompted a vote for his removal, it should be remembered that the removal was attempted at the beginning of the session in December, 1870, and threatened in debate on December 21, some weeks before the memorandum of Jan. 17, 1871, about Canada was written. Mr
p. 26, 1832 Competition race in the harbor under water, July 4, 1868 Dock Town, the cove at Dock square, 1708 Oliver's, at the foot of State street, 1817 Dogs No family allowed more than one, 1697 A stringent law passed to regulate, 1784 All required to be licensed, 1824 License for females, $5; for males, $2, 1868 Dog Killers The police sent out to kill stray dogs, 1868 The City employ one man to kill, 1877 Dog Show Great exhibition at Music Hall, Sep., 1877 Door Nips began to be used by burglars, Dec., 1843 Don Pedro Brazilian Emperor, visited Boston, June 14, 1876 Downing, Major Jack on a visit at the House of Correction; a fraud, Oct. 30, 1837 Draft Military, of soldiers in Boston for the War commenced, Sep. 1, 1862 At Faneuil Hall, suspended, Sep. 13, 1862 At Faneuil Hall, postponed a second time, Sep. 30, 1862 Again commenced at Faneuil Hall, Oct. 15, 1862 At Faneuil Hall, again suspended, Nov. 5, 1862
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
g. Colonel Tribble has three children by his second marriage. Lieutenant Stephen Milton Tribble Lieutenant Stephen Milton Tribble was born in Abbeville county, S. C., in January, 1825. He was the son of Lemuel Watson Tribble, a native of Virginia, who came to South Carolina while a mere lad, and engaged in farming until he died, at the ripe age of eighty-four years. Milton, as he was known by that name, was reared on a farm and pursued the vocation of a farmer up to his death in September, 1877. He was a man of strict integrity of character, was a consistent member of the Baptist church during his active life, and it may be truthfully said his word was his bond. He was generous and kind to the poor and unfortunate, and was loved and esteemed by all who knew him; and that he was a kind master, was evidenced by the fact that nearly all of his old servants remained and worked on his farm until his death, and wept by the side of his grave. In 1862 he enlisted in Company I, Nine
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 14., Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church. (search)
on him and others. He served the church three years, and received thirty-two in full membership. During the third year he was laid aside by sickness for nearly three months. Our pulpit was supplied in various ways, several times by laymen, and the term includes women. It is pleasant to note that twice Rev. Brother Cutter of the Congregational Church preached and administered the Holy Communion. By a supreme effort enough money was raised to pay the interest overdue on mortgage to September, 1877, and the rate was reduced from eight to six per cent., but conditioned on prompt payment. When executed the mortgage was to Mr. Samuel S. Holton (Sr.), who was ever a benefactor of the church. He had negotiated the mortgage and note, which was signed by the treasurer and secretary of the trustees in their official capacity, and in no way personally endorsed, until by Mr. Holton, at its assignment to the purchaser thereof. At its maturity the holder did not demand payment and the e