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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The peace Commission-Hon. R. M. T. Hunter's reply to President Davis' letter. (search)
to any obstacle in the progress of the Conference or the object for which it was sought, except in the reception of the Confederate Commissioners. It was upon this point mainly our delay at City Point hinged. But upon all these questions and matters my views have been very fully as well as minutely given in The war between the States. &c., vol. 2, page 576, et seq., to which I refer you for details. Yours very truly, Alexander H. Stephens. 169 St. Paul street, Baltimore, 31st October, 1877. my dear Sir: Your letter of the 28th instant has been received and I proceed to comply with your request. The Commissioners appointed in 1865 to confer with the President of the United States concerning peace were furnished with a letter addressed to Mr. Francis P. Blair by President Lincoln, wherein the latter consented to receive persons coming from those in authority in the Southern States who desired to make peace on the basis of one common country. This letter we were to exh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fifth annual meeting of the Southern Historical Society, October 31st., 1877. (search)
Fifth annual meeting of the Southern Historical Society, October 31st., 1877. The following splendid oration treats mainly of post bellum history; but this is a period of great importance as exhibiting the fruits of the doctrines of the Federal war-party. The distinguished orator has given a picture of the violation of the peace of ‘65, and the war upon the Constitution made by the Radical party, which should be widely read, and most carefully preserved as material for the future histori deceased, and its profoi)lnd regret for the loss the Society has sustained in his death; which is ordered to be entered on the Journal. Fifth annual report of the Executive Committee of the Southern Historical Society, for year Ending October 31st, 1877. General D. H. Maury then read the following. The Executive Committee have to report that during the past year they have endeavored to keep in view the great objects of the trust committed to their charge; that they have steadily wo
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 55: Fessenden's death.—the public debt.—reduction of postage.— Mrs. Lincoln's pension.—end of reconstruction.—race discriminations in naturalization.—the Chinese.—the senator's record.—the Cuban Civil War.—annexation of San Domingo.—the treaties.—their use of the navy.—interview with the presedent.—opposition to the annexation; its defeat.—Mr. Fish.—removal of Motley.—lecture on Franco-Prussian War.—1869-1870. (search)
up. Neither they nor any member of the committee ever complained that Sumner was an obstruction to a report. Fish did not press for a vote, and makes no statement that he did, in his account of the interview printed in the Boston Transcript, Oct. 31, 1877. The delay was quite agreeable to the President, who was hoping for a favorable turn. Morrill of Vermont at this time alone made any considerable remarks, beginning on the 29th, and finishing the next day. Sumner was silent, showing no dispoch the exigencies of his official relations were hurrying him. Sumner, when the session opened in December, 1870, had given no occasion for a disturbance of the old friendship. Mr. Fish wrote years afterwards: Letter to Boston Transcript, Oct. 31, 1877. I declare positively and emphatically that Mr. Sumner never but once spoke an unkind word to me, and never a discourteous one; and on the one occasion referred to Probably with reference to Motley's removal. (in the Senate chamber in July
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 56: San Domingo again.—the senator's first speech.—return of the angina pectoris.—Fish's insult in the Motley Papers.— the senator's removal from the foreign relations committee.—pretexts for the remioval.—second speech against the San Domingo scheme.—the treaty of Washington.—Sumner and Wilson against Butler for governor.—1870-1871. (search)
ecords,—words containing an imputation which would have broken any friendship. How Mr. Fish could do this thing it is difficult to see; but it is more difficult to explain how he could write seven years later: Letter in Boston Transcript, Oct. 31, 1877. The cessation and interruption of that intimacy [with Sumner] were to me the cause of deep and continuing regret. I am not conscious of any just cause for the discontinuing of the relations which had existed between us. Mr. Fish's partisee,—first naming the number as from eight to eleven, and afterwards on a call for a specification enumerating nine,—and in leaving them unreported at the time of his removal, Fish's interview and letter in Boston Transcript, Oct. 19, 1877; Oct. 31, 1877. a charge which the secretary had already privately communicated to General Grant, and which the general on his authority continued to repeat. Letter of Mr. Copeland from Edinburgh to the New York Herald, Sept. 25, 1877. According to this<