hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for October 31st, 1877 AD or search for October 31st, 1877 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 55: Fessenden's death.—the public debt.—reduction of postage.— Mrs. Lincoln's pension.—end of reconstruction.—race discriminations in naturalization.—the Chinese.—the senator's record.—the Cuban Civil War.—annexation of San Domingo.—the treaties.—their use of the navy.—interview with the presedent.—opposition to the annexation; its defeat.—Mr. Fish.—removal of Motley.—lecture on Franco-Prussian War.—1869-1870. (search)
up. Neither they nor any member of the committee ever complained that Sumner was an obstruction to a report. Fish did not press for a vote, and makes no statement that he did, in his account of the interview printed in the Boston Transcript, Oct. 31, 1877. The delay was quite agreeable to the President, who was hoping for a favorable turn. Morrill of Vermont at this time alone made any considerable remarks, beginning on the 29th, and finishing the next day. Sumner was silent, showing no dispoch the exigencies of his official relations were hurrying him. Sumner, when the session opened in December, 1870, had given no occasion for a disturbance of the old friendship. Mr. Fish wrote years afterwards: Letter to Boston Transcript, Oct. 31, 1877. I declare positively and emphatically that Mr. Sumner never but once spoke an unkind word to me, and never a discourteous one; and on the one occasion referred to Probably with reference to Motley's removal. (in the Senate chamber in July
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 56: San Domingo again.—the senator's first speech.—return of the angina pectoris.—Fish's insult in the Motley Papers.— the senator's removal from the foreign relations committee.—pretexts for the remioval.—second speech against the San Domingo scheme.—the treaty of Washington.—Sumner and Wilson against Butler for governor.—1870-1871. (search)
ecords,—words containing an imputation which would have broken any friendship. How Mr. Fish could do this thing it is difficult to see; but it is more difficult to explain how he could write seven years later: Letter in Boston Transcript, Oct. 31, 1877. The cessation and interruption of that intimacy [with Sumner] were to me the cause of deep and continuing regret. I am not conscious of any just cause for the discontinuing of the relations which had existed between us. Mr. Fish's partisee,—first naming the number as from eight to eleven, and afterwards on a call for a specification enumerating nine,—and in leaving them unreported at the time of his removal, Fish's interview and letter in Boston Transcript, Oct. 19, 1877; Oct. 31, 1877. a charge which the secretary had already privately communicated to General Grant, and which the general on his authority continued to repeat. Letter of Mr. Copeland from Edinburgh to the New York Herald, Sept. 25, 1877. According to this<