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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 221 221 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 34 34 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 33 33 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 26 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 15 15 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 11 11 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 10 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 6 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 6 6 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1879 AD or search for 1879 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 221 results in 202 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbe, Cleveland, 1838- (search)
Cleveland, 1838- Meteorologist; born in New York, Dec. 3, 1838. He was graduated at the College of the City of New York in 1857; studied astronomy with Brunnow at Ann Arbor. Mich., and with Gould at Cambridge, Mass.; and, after serving four years in the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. spent two years in study at the Nicholas Central Observatory at Pulkowa, Russia. In 1868 he became director of the Cincinnati Observatory, and while there began making daily weather reports to the local Chamber of Commerce. The value of this work induced the United States government to establish a similar bureau. He was appointed meteorologist to the United States signal service (q. v.) in 1871, and in 1879 became meteorologist to the United States weather Bureau (q. v.). In addition to his duties in this field, he also became editor of the Monthly weather review, Professor of Meteorology in Columbian University, Washington D. C., and Lecturer on Meteorology in Johns Hopkins University.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anderson, Richard Herron, 1821-1879 (search)
Anderson, Richard Herron, 1821-1879 Military officer; born in South Carolina. Oct. 7, 1821; was graduated at West Point in 1842. He served in the war with Mexico; and in March, 1861, he left the army and became a brigadier-general in the Confederate service. He was wounded at Antietam; commanded a division at Gettysburg; and was made lieutenant-general in 1864. He died in Beaufort, S. C., June 26, 1879.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arctic exploration. (search)
pe. Finally, by the help of Congress, Captain Hall was enabled to sail, with a well-furnished company, in the ship Polaris, for the polar seas, in June, 1871. In October Hall left the vessel, and started northward on a sledge expedition. On his return he suddenly sickened and died, and the Polaris returned without accomplishing much. The passage from the coast of western Europe, around the north of that continent and of Asia, into the Pacific Ocean, was first accomplished in the summer of 1879, by Professor Nordenskjold, an accomplished Swedish explorer, in the steamship Vega. She passed through Bering Strait into the Pacific Ocean, and reached Japan in the first week in September. Thus the great problem has been solved. the Jeannette, Lieutenant De Long, an American exploring vessel, was lost on the coast of Siberia, in 1881. The most important of the recent expeditions into Arctic legions by Americans are those of Lieut. (now Brig.-Gen.) Adolphus W. Greely and of Lieut. Rob
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arizona, (search)
. This young goddess was called Arizonia, the name signifying Maiden Queen. This Arizonia dwelt upon the earth a great length of time in lonely solitude, until at a certain time, while basking in the sunbeams, a drop of dew from heaven rested upon arizonia, who in due time blessed the world with twins, a son and a daughter, and these became the father and mother of the Zuni Indians, and from this tribe arose all other races of men, the black, white, olive, and all other clay-colored men being merely apostate offshoots from this original tribe, and the Zunis being the only pure, original stock, children of the sun, now upon the earth. Governors of the Territory.  Term of Office. R. C. McCormick1867-69 A. P. K. Safford1870-77 John P. Hoyt1878 John C. Fremont1879-82 Frederick Tuttle1882-85 C. Meyer Zulick1885-89 Lewis Wolfley1889-91 John N. Irwin1891-92 Nathan O. Murphy1892-94 Lewis C. Hughes1894-96 Benj. J. Franklin1896-97 Myron H. McCord1897-99 Nathan O. Murphy1899--
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arkansas, (search)
1874 Augustus H. Garland1874 to 1876 Wm. R. Miller1877 to 1881 Thos. J. Churchill1881 to 1883 Jas. H. Berry1883 to 1885 Simon P. Hughes1885 to 1889 James P. Eagle1889 to 1893 Wm. M. Fishback1893 to 1895 James P. Clarke1895 to 1897 Daniel W. Jones1897 to 1901 Jefferson Davis1901 to---- United States Senators from the State of Arkansas. names.No. of Congress.Date. William S. Fulton24th to 28th1836 to 1844 Ambrose H. Sevier24th to 30th1836 to 1848 Chester Ashley28th to 30th1844 to 1848 Solon Borland30th to 33d1848 to 1853 Wm. K. Sebastian30th to 36th1848 to 1861 Robert W. Johnston33d to 36th1853 to 1861 37th, 38th, and 39th Congresses vacant. Alexander McDonald40th to 42d1868 to 1871 Benj. F. Rice40th to 43d1868 to 1873 Powell Clayton42d to 45th1871 to 1877 Stephen W. Dorsey44th to 46th1873 to 1879 Augustus H. Garland45th to 49th1877 to 1885 James D. Walker46th to 49th1879 to 1885 James K. Jones49th to----1885 to---- James H. Berry49th to----1885 to----
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bartholdi, Frederic Auguste. (search)
ts of brass were laid and beaten down until they exactly fitted them. There were 300 sheets of brass used, each from one to three yards square, and weighing in all 88 tons. These form the outside of the statute. When this was complete, the iron frame-work or skeleton was formed on which the outer copper shell could be fastened. The right hand and torch of this remarkable statue were shown at the Centennial Exhibition at Philadelphia in 1876. The head was shown at the Paris Exposition in 1879. On July 4, 1880, the statue was formally delivered to the United States through its representative, the American minister at Paris. Bedloe's Island, in New York Harbor, but lying within the boundaries of New Jersey, was selected by the government as a suitable place for its erection, and money was raised by means of subscriptions, concerts, etc., to build a pedestal for it to rest upon. On Oct. 28, 1886, the statue was unveiled in the presence of distinguished representatives of France a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Beardslee, Lester Anthony, 1836- (search)
Beardslee, Lester Anthony, 1836- Naval officer; born in Little Falls, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1836; was graduated at the Naval Academy in 1856; brought the Confederate steam-sloop Florida, captured off Bahia, Brazil, to the United States as prize master in 1864; and while in command of the Jamestown in 1879, discovered, surveyed, and named Glacier Bay, Alaska; promoted rear-admiral in 1895.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bigelow, Erastus Brigham, 1814-1879 (search)
Bigelow, Erastus Brigham, 1814-1879 Inventor; born in West Boyleston, Mass., April 2, 1814. His father was a cotton manufacturer; and this son, before he was eighteen years of age, had invented a hand-loom for weaving suspender webbing. In 1838 he obtained a patent for an automatic loom for weaving knotted counterpanes, but soon made great improvements. In 1839 he entered into a contract with a Lowell manufacturing company to construct a power-loom for weaving two-ply ingrain carpets (that were before woven exclusively by the hand-loom, which could produce only 8 yards a day). He died in Boston, Mass., Dec. 6, 1879.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blackburn, Luke Pryor, 1816-1887 (search)
Blackburn, Luke Pryor, 1816-1887 Physician; born in Fayette county, Ky., June 16, 1816; was graduated at Transylvania University, Lexington, Ky., in 1834, and settled in that city. He removed to Natchez, Miss., in 1846, and when yellow fever broke out in New Orleans in 1848, as health-officer of Natchez he ordered the first quarantine against New Orleans that had ever been established in the Mississippi Valley. He was a surgeon on the staff of the Confederate General Price during the Civil War. When yellow fever appeared in Memphis, he hastened to that city. and organized corps of physicians and nurses, and later went to Hickman. Ky., and gave aid to the yellow fever sufferers there. In 1879 he was elected governor of Kentucky. Dr. Blackburn established the Blackburn Sanitarium for Nervous and Mental Diseases in 1884. He died in Frankfort. Ky., Sept. 14, 1887.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blair, Henry William, 1834- (search)
ed in the 15th New Hampshire Volunteers at the opening of the Civil War, and became lieutenant-colonel; was wounded at Fort Hudson. He was a member of Congress in 1879-79, and of the United States Senate in 1879-91. He was the author of the famous illiteracy bill which proposed to distribute $77.000,000 to the States in proporti79, and of the United States Senate in 1879-91. He was the author of the famous illiteracy bill which proposed to distribute $77.000,000 to the States in proportion to their illiteracy. This bill was passed by the Senate three times, but failed to become a law. Senator Blair was appointed United States minister to China, but resigned, as the Chinese government objected to him because cause of his opposition to (Chinese immigration to the United States.1879-91. He was the author of the famous illiteracy bill which proposed to distribute $77.000,000 to the States in proportion to their illiteracy. This bill was passed by the Senate three times, but failed to become a law. Senator Blair was appointed United States minister to China, but resigned, as the Chinese government objected to him because cause of his opposition to (Chinese immigration to the United States.
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