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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 221 221 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 34 34 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 33 33 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 26 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 15 15 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 11 11 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 10 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 6 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 6 6 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for 1879 AD or search for 1879 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 4 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 2: the hour and the man.—1862. (search)
forever settled, and slavery has been forever abolished; it no longer tarnishes the fair fame of a great and free republic. Because it was involved in the question of constitutional right, I fought four years in its defence. I tell you now, upon the honor of my manhood, that I would fight eight years, though my hairs are white, against any attempt to reinstate it in any portion of this continent (Z. B. Vance, Governor of North Carolina during the war, and U. S. Senator from that State since 1879, in a lecture delivered in Boston, Dec. 8, 1886; in Boston Daily Advertiser, Dec. 9). Slavery is a thunderbolt in the hands of the traitors to smite Lib. 32.15. the Government to the dust. That thunderbolt might be seized and turned against the rebellion with fatal effect, and at the same time without injury to the South. My heart glows when I think of the good thus to be done to the oppressors as well as to the oppressed; for I could not stand here, I could not stand anywhere, and a
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 9: Journalist at large.—1868-1876. (search)
gs at the State House before the Committees on suffrage and other bills affecting the rights of person and property of women, he was ever a faithful champion. He spoke also at many suffrage meetings in other cities and States, and wrote repeatedly on the subject for the Independent, and to conventions in distant places which he could not attend. See Independent, Dec. 31, 1868, Dec. 23, 1869, March 17, May 19, 1870, March 2, July 1, Dec. 7, 1871, April 3, 1873; Woman's Journal, passim, 1870-79; History of Woman Suffrage, Vol. 3, pp. 122, 343, 368. In other ways, too, he had opportunity to bear his testimony in behalf of equal rights for the sexes. Called upon, at a dinner of the American Institute of Homoeopathy (Boston, June 10, 1869), to respond to a toast on Reform and Reformers, he urged that women should stand on an equality with men in the medical profession, and the Institute voted by an overwhelming majority, the next day, to admit them as members, winning the honor of bei
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 11: last years.—1877-79. (search)
f the bloody shirt, Boston Advertiser, Jan. 13, 1879. that awful symbol (yet but faintly expressive)lea for the enfranchisement of women, Feb. 14, 1879. before a hostile legislative committee, at thernest letter to the New York Tribune, Feb. 15, 1879. this base and demagogical action as adding a fhistorical experience. N. Y. Tribune, Feb. 17, 1879. Mr. Blaine betrayed his sensitiveness to tPress, and in which he N. Y. Tribune, Feb. 24, 1879. endeavored to break the force of it, and becloand emphatic. Feb. 25. N. Y. Tribune, Feb. 27, 1879. Recurring to Mr. Blaine's speech as going far,— if that is too harsh N. Y. Tribune, Feb. 27, 1879. a term, certainly not consistent—in basing hisal remedy for all human ailments. Ms. Mar. 28, 1879. When obliged to keep to the house, he still wrto a Channing Memorial Boston Journal, Apr. 8, 1879. meeting at Newport, R. I., followed in quick saked, empty-handed, Boston Traveller, Apr. 24, 1879. despairing men, women, and children fleeing as[2 more...]<
ge 360, line 4 from bottom. The denial concerning Mr. Child is not quite accurate. See post, 3: 20, note 2, and 49, 83, 101. Page 395, second paragraph. For Quarterly Review read Edinburgh Review. Volume III. Page 354, note 2. To show the difficulty of attempting to write history with entire accuracy, we remark that Mr. Phillips, in 1851, called the West India interest in Parliament some fifty or sixty strong. To keep within bounds, he would claim no more than fifty votes. In 1879 (?) he wrote to F. J. G. of this incident: Yes, Buxton told me the story, and O'Connell has himself told it in one of his later speeches. But it was twenty-seven votes, not sixty, they promised him. You will tell Lizzy Pease this. Volume IV. Page 113, last line but one. Dele the comma after coming. Though it occurs in the original Ms., it perhaps implies that Mr. Thompson accompanied Mr. Garrison to Baltimore, which was not the case. His coming was expected. Page 166, note 2, la