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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 221 221 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 34 34 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 33 33 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 26 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 15 15 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 11 11 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 10 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 6 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1879 AD or search for 1879 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battlefields of Virginia. (search)
upper and nether millstone. The very boldness of the movement contributed much to insure its success. General Fitzhugh Lee, in his address at the Ninth Annual Re-union of the Virginia Division of the Army of Northern Virginia Association, in 1879, says: The problem presented to General Lee's mind on Friday night, May 1st, was to decide how best to attack Hooker's army on the morning of May 2nd. Time was an important element; for near Fredericksburg, in his rear, was Sedgwick, larged for a bed, spread his saddle blanket, substituted his saddle for a pillow and his overcoat for covering, and was soon in a happy state of oblivion. Colonel Marshall is not entirely accurate in the account he furnished General Fitzhugh Lee in 1879, of the conference between Lee and Jackson, for he leaves no room for what passed between them in my presence. It is evident that what occurred in the presence of each of us was at different times during a conference which lasted several hours.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.37 (search)
s before we had hardly a dollar or a seed, an animal or a tool, or a dust of fertilizer to begin with. In the season of 1879 when the last of the alien State governments had been overthrown and order had been conquered from social and political chUnited States last year consumed approximately 5,000,000 bales of cotton, or as much as the entire cotton crop produced in 1879, and the value of our exports of raw cotton for the past season is placed at more than $400,000, ooo. The crop of 1879, wi1879, with which this comparison is made, was, at that time, the largest the South had ever raised, the production having more than doubled in the preceding ten years, or since 1869, when the total crop was 2,366,467 bales. The mere recitation of these resulnd the District of Columbia amounted to $10,385,000. Ten years later, at the close of the period of reconstruction, or say 1879-80, these expenditures amounted to $12,678,000. It was then that the South began to recuperate. Expenditures for 1890 pra