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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 241 241 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 40 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 32 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 15 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 9 9 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese). You can also browse the collection for 1880 AD or search for 1880 AD in all documents.

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Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese), book 3, chapter 9 (search)
of clauses is parisosis; the similarity of the final syllables of each clause paromoiosis. This must take place at the beginning or end of the clauses. At the beginning the similarity is always shown in entire words; at the end, in the last syllables, or the inflections of one and the same word, or the repetition of the same word. For instance, at the beginning: *)agro\n ga\r e)/laben a)rgo\n par' au)tou=,Aristoph. frag. 649 (Kock, Com. Att. Frag. 1.1880). “for he received from him land untilled”; dwrhtoi/ t' e)pe/lonto para/rrhtoi/ t' e)pe/essin,Hom. Il. 9.526. “they were ready to accept gifts and to be persuaded by words;” at the end: w)|h/qhsan au)to\n paidi/on tetoke/nai, a)ll' au)tou= ai)/tion gegone/nai,The text is obviously corrupt. “they thought that he was the father of a child, but that he was the cause of it”; e)n plei/stais de\ fronti/si kai\ e)n e)l