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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 241 241 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 40 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 32 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 15 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 9 9 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for 1880 AD or search for 1880 AD in all documents.

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fter the close of the war he commanded the Nez Perce Indian expedition of 1877, the Bannock, and Piute campaigns, and from 1880 to 1882, was superintendent of the Military Academy, West Point. He was (1865-74) commissioner of the Bureau of Refugees,, and was brevetted major-general the following year. In the regular army he rose to the rank of colonel in 1877, and, in 1880, was retired from active service. He died in Baltimore, May 20, 1881. Fourth Army Corps (Potomac) Created March 3, lar army, serving with the Twenty-sixth and other infantry regiments. He was aide-de-Camp to General Sherman from 1875 to 1880. In 1890 he was made brigadier-general, and became major-general, in 1894. He held several public positions of honor, annded in the assault on Fort Harrison, but did not give up his command. Ord was retired with full rank of major-general in 1880, and died July 22, 1883, in Havana, Cuba. Twenty-fifth Army Corps Created December 3, 1864, to consist of the colore
and of the corps in October. After the war, he engaged in business in New Orleans and held several political offices. In 1880– 81 he was American minister to Turkey, and in 1898 he was appointed United States railway commissioner. He died at Gainee's surrender. After the war, he became prominent in Georgia politics and was United States senator from that State, 1873-1880, and in 1891-1897. Lieutenant-generals of the Confederacy—group no. 3 Alexander peter Stewart a leader in n the retreat from Nashville. After the war he became a planter in Mississippi; a member of the State legislature; and in 1880 he became president of the Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College. He was also at the head of the Vicksburg Natifolk and Tennessee Railroad and became a leading figure in Virginia politics, being elected to the United States Senate in 1880, where he acted with the Republican party. He failed of re-election on the expiration of his term in 1887, and died at Wa
y of the Republic before the end of the nineteenth century had passed the zenith of its career. Its membership remained about the same in numbers after its first great leap and subsequent subsidence, varying between 25,000 and 50,000 from 1870 to 1880. During the decade between 1880 and 1890 it rose to its highest number of 409,--489. Since then it has decreased, through death, in very great part, until, at the national encampment of 1910, at Atlantic City, it had diminished to 213,901. Its 1880 and 1890 it rose to its highest number of 409,--489. Since then it has decreased, through death, in very great part, until, at the national encampment of 1910, at Atlantic City, it had diminished to 213,901. Its posts exist throughout the length and breadth of the country, and even outside, and nearly every State has a department organization. Its influence is felt in every city, town, and village, and it has earned the good — will and support of the entire American people. Among its leaders have been some of the most prominent men of the country. Its commanders-in-chief have been: B. F. Stephenson,Illinois,1866 S. A. Hurlbut,Illinois,1866-67 John A. Logan,Illinois,1868-70 Ambrose E. Burnside,R