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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 2 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 1 1 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Child, Lydia Maria 1802-1880 (search)
Child, Lydia Maria 1802-1880 Author; born in Medford, Mass., Feb. 11, 1802; educated in the common schools; began her literary career in 1819; and was noted as a supporter of the abolition movement. In 1859 she sent a letter of sympathy to John Brown, who was then imprisoned at Harper's Ferry, offering to become his nurse. This offer he declined, but requested her to aid his family, which she did. Governor Wise, of Virginia, politely rebuked her in a letter, and another epistle from Senator Mason's wife threatened her with eternal punishment. These letters with her replies were subsequently published and reached a circulation of 300,000. In 1840-43 she was editor of the National Anti-slavery standard. Her publications include The rebels; The first settlers of New England; Freedman's book; Appeal for that class of Americans called Africans; Miria, a romance of the republic, etc. She died in Wayland, Mass., Oct. 20, 1880.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
......July 20, 1880 General Hancock accepts Democratic nomination......July 29, 1880 International sheep-and-wool show held at Philadelphia, Pa.......September, 1880 Return of the Schwatka Arctic exploration expedition to New York......Sept. 23, 1880 Arctic steamer Gulnare returns to Washington......Oct. 10, 1880 Publication of forged letters on the Chinese question (Morey letters) attributed to General Garfield, addressed to a mythical person, H. L. Morey, of Lynn,......Oct. 20, 1880 Presidential election......Nov. 2, 1880 Lucretia Mott, born 1793, dies in Montgomery county, Pa......Nov. 11, 1880 Electoral votes of States, except Georgia, cast......Dec. 6, 1880 Third session meets......Dec. 6, 1880 President Hayes's fourth annual message presented......Dec. 6, 1880 Electoral vote of Georgia, 11 for Hancock and English, cast......Dec. 8, 1880 R. W. Thompson, Secretary of Navy, resigns......Dec. 15, 1880 Nearly one mile of Broadway, New York, is
r, 73, 273; comments on G.'s libel trial, 229; part in founding New Eng. A. S. Soc'y, 278-280; trustee Noyes Academy, 454; catechizes A. Lawrence, 455; literary style, 461; accompanies Thompson, 2.3; projected trip to Texas, 105; on non-resistance in A. S. Constitution, 304, on Third Party, 312; on World's Convention, 351, delegate thereto, 353; reporter for Standard, 360.—Letter to G., 2.1. Child, Isaac, 1.278. Child, Lydia Maria [b. Medford, Mass., Feb. 11, 1802; d. Wayland, Mass., Oct. 20, 1880], nee Francis, married D. L. Child, 1.73; religious views censured by G., 157; talks about G. during his imprisonment, 229; first meeting and its effect, 1.418, 2.90; her Appeal, 1.418, 2.90, and Oasis, 1.361, 2.39; literary style, 1.461; accompanies Thompson to N. Y., 2.3; describes Reign of Terror, 1.490; at Mrs. Chapman's, 2.105; at Miss Sargent's, 106; defines Transcendentalism and Perfectionism, 204; at Non-Resistance meeting, 327; made member Exec. Com. Am. A. S. S., 349, and dele
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Introduction. (search)
s and reverent curiosity of one who felt already the shadow of the unseen world resting upon her. Her death was sudden and quite unexpected. For some months she had been troubled with a rheumatic affection, but it was by no means regarded as serious. A friend, who visited her a few days before her departure, found her in a comfortable condition, apart from lameness. She talked of the coming election with much interest, and of her plans for the winter. On the morning of her death (October 20, 1880) she spoke of feeling remarkably well. Before leaving her chamber she complained of severe pain in the region of the heart. Help was called by her companion, but only reached her to witness her quiet passing away. The funeral was, as befitted one like her, plain and simple. Many of her old friends were present, and Wendell Phillips paid an affecting and eloquent tribute to his old friend and anti-slavery coadjutor. He referred to the time when she accepted, with serene self-sacr
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Personal Sketches and tributes (search)
s and reverent curiosity of one who felt already the shadow of the unseen world resting upon her. Her death was sudden and quite unexpected. For some months she had been troubled with a rheumatic affection, but it was by no means regarded as serious. A friend, who visited her a few days before her departure, found her in a comfortable condition, apart from lameness. She talked of the coming election with much interest, and of her plans for the winter. On the morning of her death (October 20, 1880) she spoke of feeling remarkably well. Before leaving her chamber she complained of severe pain in the region of the heart. Help was called by her companion, but only reached her to witness her quiet passing away. The funeral was, as befitted one like her, plain and simple. Many of her old friends were present, and Wendell Phillips paid an affecting and eloquent tribute to his old friend and anti-slavery coadjutor. He referred to the time when she accepted, with serene self-sacr
n Brown's execution at Harper's Ferry; The Freedman's Book; A Romance of the Republic; Looking toward Sunset; and, only two years before her death, Aspirations of the World. Her death occurred quite unexpectedly on the morning of the twentieth of October, 1880. She had been as well as usual, and had been making plans for the winter, when suddenly she complained of a severe pain, and before help could be summoned, passed gently away, in the seventy-ninth year of her age. A few friends from Me, and told us, as only he could, of the struggles and the triumphs which had built the noble character he described. Then, led by the whitehaired undertaker, the small procession slowly walked to the burying-ground near by, and as we stood there, in reverent silence, a magnificent rainbow spanned the eastern sky. Inscription on the stone at Mrs. Child's Grave in Wayland. Lydia Maria Child born Feb. 11, 1802 died Oct. 20, 1880 You call us dead We are not dead We are truly living now.