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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 189 189 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 38 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 23 23 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 16 16 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 9 9 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 8 8 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1882 AD or search for 1882 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
rmer publication, and wish to give his name if we can. The Macon Light Artillery afterwards formed a part of Colonel John C. Haskell's command in North Carolina. Colonel Edgar F. Moseley in Virginia, and Major Jos. G. Blount, of Georgia, commanded the batallion at the surrender, composed of Young's, Cummings's, Mitlers, and the Macon Light Artillery. Very respectfully, N. M. Hodgkins. The hero of Fredericksburg of whom General Alexander spoke in his admirable paper in our November (1882) number, as carrying water to the wounded of the enemy at the peril of his own life was, of course, Richard Kirkland, of South Carolina, of whom General Kershaw wrote so interesting a sketch. [See Vol. 8, S. H. S. Papers, page 186.] Two unknown heroes of the ranks. Our accomplished friend, Colonel Charles H. Olmstead, of Savannah, has furnished us the following incident which is but one of a thousand similar ones which might be given to illustrate the morale of the men who wore the gra
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
rmer publication, and wish to give his name if we can. The Macon Light Artillery afterwards formed a part of Colonel John C. Haskell's command in North Carolina. Colonel Edgar F. Moseley in Virginia, and Major Jos. G. Blount, of Georgia, commanded the batallion at the surrender, composed of Young's, Cummings's, Mitlers, and the Macon Light Artillery. Very respectfully, N. M. Hodgkins. The hero of Fredericksburg of whom General Alexander spoke in his admirable paper in our November (1882) number, as carrying water to the wounded of the enemy at the peril of his own life was, of course, Richard Kirkland, of South Carolina, of whom General Kershaw wrote so interesting a sketch. [See Vol. 8, S. H. S. Papers, page 186.] Two unknown heroes of the ranks. Our accomplished friend, Colonel Charles H. Olmstead, of Savannah, has furnished us the following incident which is but one of a thousand similar ones which might be given to illustrate the morale of the men who wore the gra
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
prison question generally, in which he justifies the hanging of Wirtz, but attributes the responsibility of murdering thousands of Union soldiers to the hellish malice of the representative men of the Southern Confederacy, two of the most prominent of whom were Jefferson Davis and Robert E. Lee, displays on his own part a blind malice, only equalled by his profound ignorance of the facts, We shall hereafter pay our respects to some of these remarkable utterances— remarkable for one writing in 1882 instead of 1865—and show up their utter absurdity. Meantime, if Mr. Gerrish can produce a single one of the orders from General Lee or President Davis, or any other prominent Confederate leader which, either directly or indirectly, approved of cruelty to prisoners, he will make a contribution to history, which Holt and his infamous band of Perjurers, in the days when the Bureau of Military Justice was flourishing, sought for in vain. But despite of these very serious blots, it is a well w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
262 West Baltimore street; John B. Piet, 174 West Baltimore street; Baltimore News Company, Sun Iron Building; West & Johnston, Richmond, Va.; W. H. Moore Son, 475 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington; Page Courier, Luray, Page county, Va. This book has been too long before the public to need any commendation from us; but surely the fact that the few remaining copies will be sold for the benefit of the orphan children of the gallant soldier, will cause them to be bought up at once. 1861 vs. 1882. Co. Aytch, Maury's Grays, first Tenn. Reg't, or A side show of the Big show. By Sam. R. Wat-Kins, Columbia, Tenn. We say nothing as to its literary merits, or the taste of some things in it, but we do not hesitate to advise all who want a picture of the private Confederate soldier as he was, in camp, on the march, in the bivouac, on the battle-field, in the hospital—to send $1.50 to the author at Columbia, Tenn., and procure a copy of this book. Some of the pictures of soldier life are