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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 189 189 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 38 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 23 23 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 16 16 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 9 9 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 8 8 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier). You can also browse the collection for 1882 AD or search for 1882 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Personal Poems (search)
lemn and tender, The music rose and fell With a joy akin to sadness And a greeting like farewell. With a sense of awe he listened To the voices sweet and young; The last of earth and the first of heaven Seemed in the songs they sung. And waiting a little longer For the wonderful change to come, He heard the Summoning Angel, Who calls God's children home And to him in a holier welcome Was the mystical meaning given Of the words of the blessed Master: ‘Of such is the kingdom of heaven!’ 1882. A welcome to Lowell. take our hands, James Russell Lowell, Our hearts are all thy own; To-day we bid thee welcome Not for ourselves alone. In the long years of thy absence Some of us have grown old, And some have passed the portals Of the Mystery untold; For the hands that cannot clasp thee, For the voices that are dumb, For each and all I bid thee A grateful welcome home! For Cedarcroft's sweet singer To the nine-fold Muses dear; For the Seer the winding Concord Paused by his door to
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Occasional Poems (search)
thy loyal hearts rejoice In the glad, sonorous voice, Ringing from the brazen mouth Of the bell of the Old South,— Ringing clearly, with a will, ‘What she was is Boston still!’ 1879. Garden. A hymn for the American Horticultural Society, 1882. O Painter of the fruits and flowers, We own Thy wise design, Whereby these human hands of ours May share the work of Thine! Apart from Thee we plant in vain The root and sow the seed; Thy early and Thy later rain, Thy sun and dew we need. Our mong us welcome as the Spring, Calling up blossoms where her light feet stray. God keep you both, make beautiful your way, Comfort, console, and bless; and safely bring, Ere yet I make upon a vaster sea The unreturning voyage, my friends to me. 1882. Winter roses. In reply to a flower gift from Mrs. Putnam's school at Jamaica Plain. my garden roses long ago Have perished from the leaf-strewn walks; Their pale, fair sisters smile no more Upon the sweet-brier stalks. Gone with the flow<
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Appendix (search)
dropping from the hands Of trustful love and friendship, as you go Forth on your journey to those older lands, By saint and sage and bard and hero trod? Scarcely the simple farewell of the Friends Sufficeth; after you my full heart sends Such benediction as the pilgrim hears Where the Greek faith its golden dome uprears, From Crimea's roses to Archangel snows, The fittest prayer of parting: ‘Go with God!’ On a Fly-leaf of Longfellow's Poems. [written at the Asquam House in the summer of 1882.] Hushed now the sweet consoling tongue Of him whose lyre the Muses strung; His last low swan-song has been sung! His last! And ours, dear friend, is near; As clouds that rake the mountains here, We too shall pass and disappear. Yet howsoever changed or tost, Not even a wreath of mist is lost, No atom can itself exhaust. So shall the soul's superior force Live on and run its endless course In God's unlimited universe. And we, whose brief reflections seem To fade like clouds from lake an