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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 226 226 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 35 35 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 20 20 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for 1883 AD or search for 1883 AD in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
he light, and calls it Perfectionism. As a definition, this does not help matters much, even when illumined by the fact that both Perfectionism and Transcendentalism, as applied to the conduct of life, led up to socialism—the Oneida Community and Brook Farm. The passage just quoted, however, does bear upon the charge of fanaticism already brought by Elizur Wright against Mr. Garrison. No one has accused Dr. Channing of being a fanatic because he gave the initial Atlantic Monthly, Oct., 1883, p. 534. impulse to the Brook Farm experiment. Nobody saw fanaticism in that portion of his letter to the abolitionists in which he said: The liberation of three millions of Lib. 7.206. slaves is indeed a noble object; but a greater work is the diffusion of principles by which every yoke is to be broken, every government to be regenerated, and a liberty more precious than civil or political is to be secured to the world. This, coming a week after Mr. Garrison's prospectus, sounds like a pl
s., Feb. 1, 1792; d. there Mar. 31, 1883], head of Worcester Convention, 2.244; alienated from G., 271, opposes enrolment of women, 297.—Portrait in Reminiscences, 1883. Allen, Richard, 2.380. Allen, William [1770-1843], leading English Quaker abolitionist, 1.340, signs protest against Colon. Soc., 361. Alton riots, 2.184- Samuel, Capt., 1.3, 192. Brockway, Charles J., 1.56. Brook Farm, suggested by Channing, 2.205, founded by G. Ripley, 421. Brooks, Charles Timothy, Rev. [1813-1883], 1.463. Brooks, Nathan, 2.287. Brooks, Peter Chardon [1767-1849], 1; 488. Brougham, Henry [1779-1868], on slavery, 1.211; on G. Thompson's A. S. services, 43 S., 349, and delegate to World's Convention, 353; edits Standard, 360.—Letter to Mrs. Loring, 1.490; newspaper Letters from New York, 1.113.—Portrait in Letters, 1883, and in Harper's Magazine, January, 1880. Choate, Rufus [1799-1859], invited to Faneuil Hall meeting, 1.487, absent, 499; on the glittering generalities of Decl<