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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 226 226 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 35 35 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 20 20 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1883 AD or search for 1883 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Complete roster of Trustees, 1875-1903. (search)
tee in his place March 2d, 1900. Major Muckenfuss died in November, 1901, and Lieutenant H. B. Olney was elected a trustee in his place January 4th, 1902. There are two trustees ex-officio—the President, W. L. I. Veteran Association, of date 1883, Colonel C. H. Simonton, and the commanding officer of the Corps—of the latter, in succession, there have been Major A. W. Marshall, 1883; Captain Julius E. Cogswell, 1890; Captain Frank Robson, 1902. Details of these annual benefactions during1883; Captain Julius E. Cogswell, 1890; Captain Frank Robson, 1902. Details of these annual benefactions during nearly three decades are not needed, but the aggregate result will show how large a work has been quietly done. Every New Year's Day the permanent annuity of $30 is issued, with four coupons, payable quarterly. These sums, and the current calls for temporary assistance—sickness, funeral expenses, &c., &c.—foot up, since 1875, including this fiscal year of 1903, $26,52.000. The principal of the fund is now $17,000, in 5 per cent substantial securities, yielding $850 annually for twenty years
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Hunter Holmes McGuire, M. D., Ll. D. (search)
ere expressed in his chapter on the Treatment of Gun Shot Wounds, which found place in the standard works of his profession, and obtained ready acceptance by the masters of surgical art the wide world over. At the close of the war Dr. McGuire settled in the city of Richmond, to make that his future home, and was elected to fill the Chair of Surgery in the Medical College of Virginia, then recently made vacant by the death of Dr. Charles Bell Gibson, and he held this chair until 1878. In 1883, he founded the St. Luke's Home for the Sick, with its attendant training school for nurses. The increasing demands upon this institution soon required an enlargement of space and facilities; it was removed in 1899 to a new building erected for the purpose in the western part of the city, which remains another monument to his wise sagacity and pious zeal. Impressed with the need for a larger and more thorough culture, to keep pace with the vast strides which modern explorations were maki
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Rank, respectively, in the United States and Confederate States armies. (search)
was only a Lieutenant-Colonel and a Brigadier by brevet. The first full general in the history of the United States army was U. S. Grant. He was first given the rank in 1864, and was succeeded by Sherman in 1869, who was succeeded by Sheridan in 1883. These three are the only officers who ever attained the rank of General. Schofield, who succeeded Sheridan in 1883, was given the rank of Lieutenant-General by Congress previous to his retirement. Nelson A. Miles also retired as a Lieutenant-1883, was given the rank of Lieutenant-General by Congress previous to his retirement. Nelson A. Miles also retired as a Lieutenant-General, and so did S. B. M. Young a few days ago, when Major-General Chaffee succeded to that rank. The number of generals in the Confederate service was eight. This equals the number of lieutenant-generals in the United States army from Washington to Chaffee. The Confederacy had nineteen Lieutenant-Generals. Grant was the only Federal officer who attained this rank during the war, though at the beginning of the war General Wingfield Scott held this rank by brevet. In the Confederate ser