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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 188 188 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 40 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 29 29 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 23 23 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 19 19 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 15 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 13 13 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 8 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for 1884 AD or search for 1884 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
atarian letter from Clarkson, which Nathaniel Colver had craftily procured, and introduced at the earliest moment. The snare was too obviously meant—on the one hand for Mr. Garrison himself, on the other for the Lectures and Biog. Sketches, ed. 1884, p. 354. Convention, whose members sought, as Emerson well said, something better and more satisfying than a vote or a definition. This peculiar body met once more and finally on the Lib. 11.175, 178, 179. 26th, 27th, and 28th of October, 1841 (p. 64), showing the liberalizing effect upon himself, unsuspected at the time, of those ‘memorable interviews and conversations, in the hall, in the lobbies, or around the doors,’ of which Emerson tells ( Lectures and Biographical Sketches, ed. 1884, p. 354). On the appearance of Theodore Parker's epochmaking ordination sermon on ‘The Transient and Permanent in Christianity,’ preached May 19, 1841 (Frothingham's Life of Parker, p. 152, Weiss's Life, 1.165), Garrison said gravely to his fri
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
as can nowhere else be found. See the rubric The Bloody and Oppressive South, in Lib. 15: 20, 32, and passim in the volumes for 1845, 1846, etc., usually on the fourth page of the paper. This curse of slave society has long survived the abolition of slavery. See H. V. Redfield's Homicide, North and South (Philadelphia, 1880), and the fusillade of satire directed against Southern public sentiment concerning passionate and cold-blooded murder, in the N. Y. Evening Post and Nation in 1882-84. The list was begun a year ago, and this paper is full of short paragraphs. [Here Mr. Garrison unrolled a paper, the width of one of our columns, made up of short accounts of murders, etc., and unrolled it from end to end. It was above 12 yards long. There were calls for a few to be read. Mr. Garrison then read two or three, and then continued.] And yet there are those who attempt to excuse this state of things. I am sorry that there are Englishmen disposed to apologize for these American
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
personal dignity, of the time. He found himself in the midst of Francis and Edmund Jackson, of Wendell Phillips, of Edmund Quincy, of Charles F. Hovey, of William H. Furness, of Samuel May, Jr., of Sydney Howard Gay, of Isaac T. Hopper, of Henry C. Wright, of Abby Kelley Foster, of Frederick Douglass, of Mr. Garrison—against whom his menaces were specially directed. Never was a human being more out of his element. Isaiah Rynders, a native American, of mixed German N. Y. Times, Jan. 14, 1884. and Irish lineage, was now some forty-six years of age. He began life as a boatman on the Hudson River, and, passing easily into the sporting class, went to seek his fortunes as a professional gambler in the paradise of the Southwest. In this region he became familiar with all forms of violence, including the institution of slavery. After many personal hazards and vicissitudes, he returned to New York city, where he proved to be admirably qualified for local political leadership in connect