hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 188 188 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 40 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 29 29 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 23 23 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 19 19 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 15 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 13 13 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 8 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 8 8 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1884 AD or search for 1884 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
ealized that Mr. Benjamin was right, came down from the bench, took him by the hand, apologized, and begged him to proceed, which he did, winning the case. The next week, Mr. Benjamin was tendered a banquet for his temerity, by the leading members of the English bar. His English practice. It was estimated that Mr. Benjamin enjoyed an income of $75,000 a year from his English practice, and at his death he left a fortune of $300,000 to two relatives in New Orleans. He died in Paris in 1884. In person Mr. Benjamin was rather short, heavy set, with square shoulders, and was inclined toward corpulency. His face was typically Jewish, the short black beard he wore helping to intensify it. His ability to sway an audience by his eloquence was nothing short of marvellous. When in Richmond he resided on Main street, between Fourth and Fifth. He invariably wore the most immaculate of linen, was always cheerful and affable, and never traveled without a copy of Tennyson, and, strange