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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 268 268 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 41 41 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 29 29 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 27 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 20 20 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 11 11 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 11 11 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for 1885 AD or search for 1885 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 9: operations of Admiral Dupont's squadron in the sounds of South Carolina. (search)
ring to execute. It must have been surprising at times to the people residing along these narrow inlets, to see good-sized gun-boats ploughing their way at full speed through t h e i r tortuous and shallow channels,where the keel of a war vessel had never before passed. It was gall and wormwood to them to witness these excursions of floating batteries, against which they soon found that their flying artillery was of no mortal use. Rear-Admiral C. R. P. Rodgers, (from photograph taken in 1885.) Admiral Dupont had in his squadron a corps of officers belonging to the coast survey, under the immediate direction of Captain Boutelle, First Assistant. The Coast Survey office had abandoned its legitimate duties at the commencement of the war, and now furnished most valuable aid by sending its officers to any squadron requiring them. Captain Boutelle was invaluable to Admiral Dupont, and frequent mention is made of the honorable service he performed in piloting vessels through these
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
ssel; before doing which, he spiked the only gun the schooner carried and set fire to her, as she had a shot through her at the water line, and the pilot on whom Jouett had depended to take the vessel out was shot down. Lieutenant Jouett himself was severely wounded by a boarding pike in the hands of an enemy; Mr. William Carter, gunner, was wounded, one man killed of the boat's crew and six wounded, one of whom afterwards died. Rear-Admiral James E. Jouett, (from A. Photograph taken in 1885.) This was a gallant and well-executed affair, and no doubt the General Rusk would have been captured but for the discovery of the boats. A boarding party against an enemy well armed and prepared for such an event is always a dangerous affair. The odds are always in favor of those on board the vessel, but in this case the schooner was carried by one boat only, because the other one did not get alongside in time to be of much assistance. Captain McKean, who commanded the Gulf blockadi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 38: review of the work done by the Navy in the year 1863. (search)
chinery, to meet the wants of the occasion, had increased the squadron from 21 vessels, all out of repair, to 121, mounting 680 guns, with which force, co-operating with the Army, the Mississippi was opened to the sea, and all its tributaries brought under control of the Federal Government. Mr. Welles, in his official report, is almost as chary of praise for the services of the Navy before Vicksburg as was the military commanding officer in the West, who, only in his last days, in the year 1885, in a few words, gave the officers and men of the Navy full credit for their services on that occasion. The result of the herculean efforts of the Mississippi squadron was the establishment of Federal rule along the banks of the great river and its tributaries. The Confederacy was cut in twain, never to be reunited; and from this time the cause of the Rebellion began rapidly to sink. While the Federal Government was supposed to be almost overwhelmed with the severe pressure brought to