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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 2 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 1 1 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 1 1 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for May, 1886 AD or search for May, 1886 AD in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
The defense of Charleston. condensed from the North American review for May, 1886. see also articles in Vol. I., pp. 40-83, on the operations in Charleston harbor in 1861.--editors. by G. T. Beauregard, General, C. S. A. On the Union picket line — relieving pickets. A Telegram from General Cooper, dated Richmond, September 10th, 1862, reached me on that day in Mobile, It was to Bladon Springs, 75 miles north of Mobile, that, on the 17th of June, 1862, General Beauregard had gone from Tupelo for his health, on a certificate of his physicians, leaving General Bragg in temporary command of the Western Department and of the army which had been withdrawn from Corinth before Halleck. Beauregard having reported this action to the War Department, Bragg's assignment was made permanent by Mr. Davis on the 20th of June. On the 25th of August General Beauregard officially reported for duty in the field.--editors. and contained the information that, by special orders issued
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
ajority of the Senate, but I insisted that his services had been such that he should be rewarded. My wishes were now reluctantly complied with, and I assigned him to the command of one of the corps under General Butler. I was not long in finding out that the objections to Smith's promotion were well founded. After the appearance of General Grant's paper in The century magazine for February, 1886, General William F. Smith made the following reply, which was printed in that magazine for May, 1886: General Grant makes this general charge without assigning a reason for it or attempting to justify it by citing any instance in which I had failed in any duty I had been called upon to perform. This gives me the right to call General Grant himself as a witness in my own behalf, and to assert that the reasons which moved him to say that the objections to my confirmation were well founded were of a personal, and not of a public nature. The battle of Chattanooga ended on the 25th o