hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 226 226 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 42 42 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 23 23 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 15 15 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 10 10 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 8 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 8 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 6 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 6 6 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for 1888 AD or search for 1888 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
ey opened a devastating fire of artillery. This was the state of affairs when Sheridan arrived. Stopping at Winchester over night on the 18th, on his way from Washington, General Sheridan heard the noise of the battle the following morning, and hurried to the field. His coming restored confidence. A cheer from the cavalry, which awakened the echoes of the valley, greeted him and spread the good news of his coming over the field. In his Personal memoirs (New York: C. L. Webster & Co., 1888), Vol. II., General Sheridan says that toward 6 A. M. of October 19th word was brought to him (at Winchester) of the artillery firing at Cedar Creek. Between half-past 8 and 9 o'clock, while he was riding along the main street of Winchester, toward Cedar Creek, the demeanor of the people who showed themselves at the windows convinced him that the citizens had received secret information from the battle-field, and were in raptures over some good news. The narrative continues: For a sh
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 11.81 (search)
forces. Although the result of the fighting of the 15th had demonstrated that 2200 Confederates successfully withheld nearly a whole day the repeated assaults of at least 18,000 Federals, If the strength of Smith's corps as given by Genera] Badeau (Vol. II., Chap. XX., p. 354) be the correct one, and not my own computation of 22,000.-G. T. B. [More probably 18,000.--editors.] it followed, none the less, that Hancock's corps, being now in our front, with fully 28,000 A later estimate (1888), based on official returns, places Hancock's corps at 20,000.--editors. men,--which raised the enemy's force against Petersburg to a grand total of 46,000, More probably 38,000.--editors.--our chance of resistance, the next morning and in the course of the next day, even after the advent of Hoke's division, was by far too uncertain to be counted on, unless strong additional reenforcements could reach us in time. Without awaiting an answer from the authorities at Richmond to my urgent r
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Gordon's attack at Fort Stedman. (search)
in squads. My diary states that on the night of February 24th nine deserters came in on our brigade front, and on the next night fourteen, including a commissioned officer, many of them fully armed and equipped.--G. L. K. On this occasion Confederates claiming to be deserters came in in large numbers, and very soon overpowered the pickets and passed on to the first line of works. It was the intention of the Confederates to surprise Fort Haskell also. The Reverend Charles A. Mott, now (1888) pastor of the Calvary Baptist Church, Philadelphia, was a corporal in Company I, 14th Regiment, and had charge of a vidette picket-post on the right of Fort Haskell, on the night of the 24th and 25th. In a letter now in my possession, written November 1st, 1888, he states that at the opening of the attack a cannon-shot from Fort Stedman plowed the ground near his post, and very soon afterward he heard the tread of a column of the enemy advancing toward our lines.--G. L. K. This work was gua
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sherman's march from Savannah to Bentonville. (search)
for barricades. The men used their tin cups and hands as shovels, and needed no urging to induce them to work. I regretted that I had sent the message to General Sherman assuring him I needed no help, and saw the necessity of giving him information at once as to the situation. This information was carried to General Sherman by a young man, not then twenty years of age, but who was full of energy and activity and was always reliable. He was then the youngest member of my staff. He is now [1888] Governor of Ohio — Joseph B. Foraker. His work on this day secured his promotion to the rank of captain. Some years after the close of the war Foraker wrote to me calling my attention to some errors in a published account of this battle of Bentonville, and saying: Firing between the men on the skirmish-line commenced before Sherman had left us on the morning of the 19th, but it was supposed there was nothing but cavalry in our front. It was kept up steadily, and constantly increased i
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.113 (search)
y meet to honor the memory of comrades who gave their lives for their country, and at annual reunions of regimental associations, when they assemble to renew the ties of comradeship The Grand Army of the Republic, dating from 1866, numbering in 1888 over 350,000 members, is the largest veteran association in the country. Its membership is restricted to soldiers and sailors of the Union army and navy, who served during the Civil War, whether honorably discharged or still in service. The Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, numbering in 1888 about 6000 members (commissioned officers of the Union army and navy), was organized in 1865 to perpetuate the memories of the war. There are also numerous Union veteran associations, either fraternal or provident, or both; among them a national body of Naval Veterans, the societies of the Army of the Potomac, the Army of the Cumberland, the Army of the Tennessee, the Army of the Ohio, and societies of the several army corps,