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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 226 226 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 42 42 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 23 23 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 15 15 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 10 10 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 8 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 8 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 6 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1888 AD or search for 1888 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbott, Lyman, 1835- (search)
ar there, and for a time practised in partnership with his brothers Benjamin Vaughan and Austin. Subsequently he studied theology with his uncle, John Stevens Cabot, and was ordained as a Congregational minister in 1860. He was secretary of the Freedmen's Commission in 1865-68; became editor of the Literary record in Harper's magazine, and conductor of the Illustrated Christian weekly; and for a time was associated with Henry Ward Beecher (q. v.) in the editorship of The Christian Union., In 1888 he succeeded Mr. Beecher as pastor of Plymouth Church, Brooklyn. In 1898 he resigned and took full editorial charge of The outlook, formerly The Christian Union. Among his publications is A dictionary of religious knowledge. See Indian problem, the. An Anglo-American understanding. Dr. Abbott in 1898 suggested the following as the basis of an Anglo-American understanding: The American people wisely attach great importance to Washington's Farewell address, and give deserved weigh
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agnew, Cornelius Rea, 1830-1888 (search)
Agnew, Cornelius Rea, 1830-1888 Physician and surgeon; born in New York City, Aug. 8, 1830; was graduated at Columbia College in 1849, and at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1852, subsequently continuing his studies in Europe. He became surgeon-general of the State of New York in 1858, and at the beginning of the Civil War was appointed medical director of the New York State Volunteer Hospital. During the war he was also one of the most influential members of the United States Sanitary commission (q. v.). After the war he gave much attention to opthalmology, founded the Brooklyn Eye and Ear Hospital, and became Clinical Professor of the Diseases of the Eye and Ear in the New York College of Physicians and Surgeons. Dr. Agnew was actively identified with the educational institutions of New York City, and was one of the founders of the Columbia College School of Mines. He died in New York, April 8, 1888.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alaskan boundary, the. (search)
sis for its establishment by a new treaty. The Dominion government, to whom this proposal was referred, expressed the opinion that a preliminary survey was preferable to a formally constituted joint commission, and suggested that such a. survey would enable the two governments to establish a satisfactory basis for the delimitation of the boundary, and demonstrate whether the conditions of the convention of 1825 are applicable to the now more or less known features of the country. Early in 1888 several informal conferences were held in Washington between Prof. W. H. Dall, of the United States Geological Survey, and Dr. George M. Dawson, of Canada, for the purpose of discussing the boundary and elucidating. so far as the information then in existence enabled them to do, the questions which might be involved in it. The result of these conferences was communicated to Congress. A further step was taken in the convention between the United States and Great Britain of July 22, 1892, b
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alcott, Louisa May, 1832-1888 (search)
Alcott, Louisa May, 1832-1888 Author; born in Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 29, 1832; daughter of Amos Bronson Alcott. In 1862 she volunteered as a nurse, and for mouths labored in the military hospitals. In 1868 she published Little women, which almost immediately made her famous. Her other works are, Flower Fables, or fairy tales; Hospital sketches; An old-fashioned girl; a series called Aunt Jo's scrap bag, containing My boys, Shawl straps, Cupid and Chow-Chow, My girls, Jimmy's cruise in the Pinafore, and An old-fashioned Thanksgiving; Work, a story of experience; Eight cousins; Rose in bloom; Silver pitchers; Under the Lilacs; Jack and Gill; Moods; Proverb stories; Spinning-wheel stories; Lulu's Library, etc. She died in Boston, Mass., March 6, 1888.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alger, Russell Alexander, 1836- (search)
Alger, Russell Alexander, 1836- Secretary of War: born in Lafayette, O., Feb. 27, 1836; worked on a farm for years earning Russell A. Alger. money to defray the expenses of his education. He was admitted to the bar in 1859, but was forced by ill health to give up practice. When the Civil War broke out he entered the Union army as a captain, and rose to brevet brigadier-general of volunteers. After the war he entered the lumber business, in which he acquired a large fortune. He was governor of Michigan in 1885-87; was a candidate for the Republican Presidential nomination in 1888; was commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic in 1889-90; and became Secretary of War under President McKinley in 1897. During almost all of the American-Spanish War in 1898 he was subjected to much public censure on account of alleged shortcomings in the various bureaus of the War Department. He resigned his office in 1899, and wrote a history of the war with Spain.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), American party, (search)
reference to the party. It was at first a secret political organization, the chief object of which was the proscription of foreigners by the repeal of the naturalization laws of the United States, and the exclusive choice of Americans for office. The more radical members of the party advocated a purely American school system, and uncomlpromising opposition to the Roman Catholics. Such narrow views were incompatible with the generosity and catholic spirit of enlightened American citizens. In 1856 they nominated ex-President Fillmore for the Presidency, who received 874,534 popular and eight electoral votes; made no nominations in 1860, but united with the Constitutional Union party, whose candidates. Bell and Everett, received 590,631 popular and thirty-nine electoral votes; reappeared with a ticket in 1880, which received 707 popular votes; and again in 1888, when 1,591 votes were cast for the party candidates in California; and have made no nominations since. See know-Nothings.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ames, Herman Vandenburg, 1865- (search)
Ames, Herman Vandenburg, 1865- Historian; born in Lancaster, Mass., Aug. 7, 1865; was graduated at Amherst College in 1888 and later studied in Germany. In 1891-94 he was an instructor in History at the University of Michigan; in 1896-97 occupied a similar post in Ohio State University; and in the latter year accepted the chair of American Constitutional History in the University of Pennsylvania. He is author of The proposed amendments to the Constitution of the United States, for which he was awarded the prize of the American Historical Association in 1897.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anderson, Larz, 1866- (search)
Anderson, Larz, 1866- Diplomatist; born in Paris, France, Aug. 15, 1866; was graduated at Harvard College in 1888; spent two years in foreign travel: was second secretary of the United States legation and embassy in London in 1891-93, and first secretary of the embassy in Rome in 1893-97. During the war with Spain he served as a captain and adjutant-general of United States volunteers.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Andrade, Jose, (search)
plomatist; born in Merida, Venezuela, in 1838; studied law in Columbia College; was successively treasurer, secretary, and governor of the state of Zulia in 1880-84; representative for the same state in the National House of Representatives in 1884-88; and was appointed plenipotentiary to settle the claims of France against Venezuela in 1888. In 1889-90 he represented Venezuela in Washington, D. C., as a member of the Venezuelan and Marine Commissions; was also a delegate to the International M1888. In 1889-90 he represented Venezuela in Washington, D. C., as a member of the Venezuelan and Marine Commissions; was also a delegate to the International Maritime Conference, and to the Pan-American Congress; in 1893 served in the National Assembly which framed the new constitution of Venezuela and in the same year was appointed minister to the United States. In 1895 he was a member of the United States and Venezuela Claims Commission in Washington. On Feb. 2, 1897, he signed the treaty of arbitration between Venezuela and England to arrange the boundary dispute: the same year was a delegate to the Universal Postal Congress in Washington; and in
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Averill, William woods, 1832- (search)
arranged in a line extending from Staunton to Newport to intercept the raider. He dashed through this line at Covington in the face of some opposition, destroyed the bridges behind him, and one of his regiments, which had been cut off from the rest, swam the stream and joined the others, with the loss of four men drowned. Averill captured during the raid about 200 men. My command, he said in his report (Dec. 21, 1863), has marched, climbed, slid, and swam 340 miles since the 8th inst. He reported a loss of six men drowned, five wounded, and ninety missing. He performed gallant service under Hunter, Sigel, and Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley in 1864; and was brevetted major-general of volunteers in March, 1865. The same year he resigned his commission of captain in the regular army. He was consul-general at Montreal in 1866-69. In 1888, by special act of Congress, he was reappointed a captain in the army, and soon afterwards was retired. He died in Bath, N. Y., Feb. 3, 1900.
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