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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 226 226 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 42 42 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 23 23 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 15 15 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 10 10 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 8 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 8 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 7 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 6 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1888 AD or search for 1888 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Southern Historical Society Papers. (search)
pressive circumstances that the sentiments were indelibly inscribed on my mind. I at once placed myself in front of my command and had bayonets fixed; I explained to them the character of our work and perilous position of our army. The works are only one hundred yards distant, said Captain Jones—a fortunate mistake. They were, in point of fact, two hundred yards distant. For twenty-three years my impression and belief was that the works were about one hundred yards distant. In June of 1888 I visited the ground and carefully noted it. To my amazement I discovered that the distance was double what I would have sworn it was. So surprised was I at this discovery I asked several of my comrades who were in the charge what was their recollection as to the distance, and found that several of them, like myself, thought the distance only one hundred yards. The enemy can fire but one volley before the works are reached. A timely reminder was this, as, whilst advising the men of the g
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 17 (search)
llie B. Morgan as president; Mrs. C. C. Campbell, vice-president; Mrs. W. W. Stone, treasurer; all the other former officers being re-elected, except that Miss Kate Power took the place of Miss Andrews, removed from the city. The Legislature of 1888 was called upon to make an appropriation of ten thousand dollars, and the bill passed the Senate, but was defeated in the House by a vote of fifty-nine to forty-two. The Legislature, however, at this session, donated a site for the monument in tg ceremonies. Miss Winnie Davis, Daughter of the Confederacy, was present and added much to the enthusiasm of the occasion. General Charles E. Hooker was the orator of the day. The Legislature of 1890 reversed the action of the Legislature of 1888, and a bill appropriating ten thousand dollars to the monument passed the Senate by nineteen to eleven, and the House by fifty-seven to forty-one, and was promptly approved by the governor, John M. Stone, than whom there was no braver soldier nor