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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 257 257 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 34 34 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 27 27 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 23 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 12 12 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 7 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 7 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907. You can also browse the collection for 1889 AD or search for 1889 AD in all documents.

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ptain John Bonner in 1722, is a record of three trees only, standing at the time the first settlers came. One of these, represented as the largest, was the Old Elm on Boston Common, blown down in the great storm of 1876. The two others were near the middle of what is now Park street, both long since victims of the march of time. A chair made of the wood of the Old Elm is now in the Boston Public Library. One of its descendants was planted on the hill where the Soldiers' Monument stands in 1889, but it is not marked. Shawmut, as the new settlement was first named, thus presented a striking contrast to Charlestown, which is said to have been covered with timber at that time. Fuel was obtained from Deer Island. So the first duty of the new comers was to plant trees, and with an eye to domestic economy the first trees planted: were probably fruit trees. There were large gardens on the summit of Beacon Hill, and also some belonging to the residences along Summer street. A quaint